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Defense Technical Information Center Selects Wyle as Prime Contractor for SNIM Contract — Press Release

Defense Technical Information Center Selects Wyle as Prime Contractor for SNIM Contract

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., June 4 /PRNewswire/ — The Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) has awarded Wyle one of nine indefinite-quantity multiple award contracts covering Software, Networks, Information and Modeling and Simulation (SNIM) with a maximum value of $2 billion over the next five years.

SNIM serves as an efficient contracting vehicle to quickly get information assurance, software data and analysis, modeling and simulation, knowledge management and information sharing services into the hands of DOD components, other Government agencies, industry and academia.

The vehicle provides a unique and symbiotic relationship for both customers and the science and technology community. Customers fund Technical Area Tasks, which yield new Scientific and Technical Information. Under SNIM, all newly created Scientific and Technical Information will be added to one of three Information Analysis Centers (IACs).

Information Analysis Centers improve the productivity of researchers, engineers, and program managers in the research, development and acquisition communities by collecting, analyzing, processing, and disseminating worldwide scientific and technical information in their technical field of excellence.

Wyle is a leading provider of engineering and information technology services to the federal government including information technology security, cutting edge cyber-security solutions, innovative and effective IT consolidation, telecommunications, computer network defense systems integration, software development and analysis, and modeling and simulation.

Training and certification testing to meet federal Information Assurance requirements through its Information Assurance Academy, test and evaluation of networks, aircraft, weapon systems, and other government assets, as well as engineering services to the aerospace, defense, and nuclear power industries is also provided by the company.

The company also provides training and certification testing to meet federal information assurance requirements through its IA Academy, test and evaluation of networks, aircraft, weapon systems, and other government assets, as well as engineering services to the aerospace, defense, and nuclear power industries.

http://www.wylelabs.com/

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Wyle Supports New Airborne Training Platform at U.S. Navy Test Pilot School — Press Release

Wyle Supports New Airborne Training Platform at U.S. Navy Test Pilot School

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., April 22 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Naval Test Pilot School is integrating an important airborne systems training tool into a new aircraft platform expected to significantly reduce cost and increase mission success with help from Wyle engineering and technical experts.

Wyle, as a subcontractor to Calspan, is providing engineering and software expertise and aircrew support for incorporation of the Airborne Systems Training and Research Support (ASTARS) system into a new aircraft delivered to the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School in February.

The ASTARS system is an integral and unique tool in the test pilot school’s airborne systems curriculum. The training is designed to expose test pilots, naval flight officers and test engineers to avionics mission systems and hands-on instruction for test and evaluation.

Wyle has supported the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School for more than 30 years, providing as many as seven flight instructors and supporting all three of the school’s curricula including fixed wing, rotary wing and airborne systems. Wyle’s flight instructors currently perform in-flight, classroom, and laboratory instruction.

The U. S. Naval Test Pilot School, located at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., formerly hosted the ASTARS system in two NP-3D aircraft which are considerably larger and heavier than the new Calspan aircraft housing the system – a Saab 340A twin-engine turboprop.

“The Saab 340A airplane we are rehosting the ASTARS system into is very fuel efficient with only two engines as opposed to the P-3′s four,” said Bob Russell, Wyle’s test and engineering senior program manager. “The Saab 340A will perform all ASTARS missions using less fuel, while operating with a smaller flight crew and has available seating to take extra students and instructors.”

The Saab aircraft has a simulated cockpit for one student, an instructor station that can support an instructor and an additional student, and passenger seats for up to 12 students or instructors. A typical instruction flight might involve one instructor and three or four students, each of whom would get about one hour of system operation time.

Some of the systems on board the ASTARS aircraft include an APG-66 radar originally designed for the F-16, an MX-15 Electro-Optical turret with infra-red and optical cameras, an LTN-92 inertial navigation system, a global positioning system and a simulated heads-up display.

All are integrated to allow operation using multi-function displays similar to those used in tactical aircraft. Using this updated avionics suite, the instructor trains the students to be proficient as testers and evaluators of various aircraft navigation and surveillance systems.

“The Saab 340A ASTARS will provide the same highly successful training environment as the P-3 platform, but at a significantly reduced cost and with a far higher mission success rate,” said Wyle’s Mike Eide, who wrote most of the original ASTARS software when it was developed for the school in 1994 by Westinghouse.

“ASTARS provides the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School with a world-class academic tool. No other test pilot school has a comparable system.”

Eide’s knowledge as a tactical pilot, test pilot, former instructor, systems engineer and software developer gave him the aptitude to tailor the overall system design and modify the ASTARS software for the new aircraft while meeting test pilot school’s specific academic requirements.

The aircraft, which will be flown by Wyle and Calspan pilots, will first undergo instructor familiarization flights before student flights take place.

Wyle is a leading provider of high tech aerospace engineering and information technology services to the federal government on long-term outsourcing contracts. The company also provides biomedical and engineering services for NASA’s human space missions; test and evaluation of aircraft, weapon systems, networks, and other government assets; and other engineering services to the aerospace, defense, and nuclear power industries.

Source: Wyle

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Wyle Aircrew Performs First In-flight Refueling of Joint Strike Fighter Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing Variant – F-35B — Press Release

Wyle Aircrew Performs First In-flight Refueling of Joint Strike Fighter Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing Variant – F-35B

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., Feb. 3 /PRNewswire/ — Wyle air crew personnel have become the first aviators to aerially refuel the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing variant (STOVL) of the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) using a probe-and-drogue refueling system during a recent mission at Lockheed Martin’s Ft. Worth, Tex. manufacturing facility.

These first aerial refueling missions were performed by Wyle aircrew flying a Navy KC-130 tanker aircraft assigned to the U.S. Navy’s Air Test and Evaluation Squadron Twenty (VX-20) at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. The refueled aircraft, designated the F-35BF-2, represents one of three variants of this fifth generation strike fighter, developed for the U.S. military and eight allied nations.

Two of the first five F-35B aircraft slated for flight testing arrived at Patuxent River in the last quarter of 2009 and Wyle’s KC-130 aircrew team will continue to assist with refueling missions as testing progresses.

Wyle has the largest independent flight test team in the world with more than 70 members, including 53 pilots, flying 20-plus types of aircraft from supersonic manned jets to helicopters to unmanned flight systems. Among the aircraft flown by Wyle pilots are the F/A-18, V-22, E-2D, P-3, KC-130 and AH-64D.

For the refueling mission, Wyle’s crew included Steve Angay, Craig Homer, Josh Izenour, Jeff Kosich, Chris Loftis, and Bill Smith who support VX-20.

The probe-and-drogue system is used by the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and many NATO nations to refuel aircraft in flight. The system uses a flexible hose that terminates in a cone shaped basket extending from an aircraft carrying fuel. The cone shaped basket, or drogue, connects to the probe of an aircraft needing fuel. The fuel is then transferred through the hose from the tanker to the receiving aircraft.

An alternate system, called a flying boom, is used by the U.S. Air Force. This system inserts a rigid flying boom into a receptacle on a receiving aircraft. This is the system employed by the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant of the aircraft, which was the first variant to be aerially refueled.

In preparing to go to Fort Worth, the Wyle KC-130 aircrew worked with the JSF team to develop test plans, determine aircraft configurations representative of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps fleet, and make modifications to the tanker.

“A lot of the initial planning was done by our crew,” said Izenour, Wyle’s KC-130 mission commander. “These guys did an excellent job of mission planning and interfacing with the JSF team which made the actual mission itself — the flying part — go seamlessly. The amount of planning that everyone did on the front side made the execution very, very easy.”

The team planned for variables inherent in the initial test evolutions, where fuel was uploaded into the aircraft at 10,000, 15,000 and 20,000 feet, at speeds ranging from 200 to 250 knots.

“Since it was the first refuel, we didn’t know exactly how the aircraft [JSF] might behave, so we were limited as to how much pressure we could provide to the fuel lines,” said Homer. “From an engineering point of view, we had to keep very close track of the [refueling] panel during the tests.”

Wyle is a leading provider of high tech aerospace engineering and information technology services to the federal government on long-term outsourcing contracts. The company also provides biomedical and engineering services for NASA’s human space missions; test and evaluation of aircraft, weapon systems, networks, and other government assets; and other engineering services to the aerospace, defense, and nuclear power industries.

Contact:
Dan Reeder
(310) 563-6834
Ref.: NR/10-01

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Wyle to Develop Air Force Training and Operations for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems — Press Release

Wyle to Develop Air Force Training and Operations for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

EL SEGUNDO, Calif., Jan. 28 /PRNewswire/ — Wyle has signed an agreement with the Air Force Research Laboratory to develop formal flight and sensor operator training courses designed to enhance the proficiency and competence of Air Force Research Laboratory small unmanned aircraft systems flight operations with the goal of minimizing unmanned aircraft mishaps.

Wyle and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio will develop and validate detailed training, operations and related documentation for a radio-controlled aircraft system to support Department of Defense and other Federal agency intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and force protection missions.

“The objective of the agreement is to develop a commercial version of the AFRL small unmanned aircraft system for potential certification by the Federal Aviation Administration in the experimental aircraft category,” said Sam Carbaugh, who has led the project for Wyle. “This will assist in enabling both government and civilian use of small unmanned aircraft for research and development, flight demonstrations and aircrew training.”

The agreement transfers government aircraft technology directly to Wyle, enabling the company to provide training and cost-saving benefits to the Air Force. Development of a commercial small unmanned aircraft systems training course will also allow AFRL personnel to receive small unmanned aircraft systems flight qualification training during the course development phases and to obtain flight training on an as-needed basis without using limited and valuable research aircraft.

“Once we’ve proven our work with AFRL, Wyle plans to offer the training to other DoD operations, government agencies and contractors,” said Carbaugh. “As the military and other government agencies move towards more use of unmanned aircraft, there is a growing need for an adequate training program.”

To support the training portions of the program, Wyle will build and operate two aircraft, each weighing approximately 20 pounds with a wing span of approximately six feet. The aircraft are significantly modified versions of a common model radio controlled aircraft which AFRL uses for various sensor and flight control research projects.

The aircraft will be operated by a ground control unit with operator controls and a laptop computer which will program the aircraft and record operational data. An optical camera system will be installed as a sensor system.

Adaptation of commercially available hobby aircraft with advanced navigation, communications and computer flight controls for use in aviation sensor technology research has resulted in various configurations of aircraft that have proven reliable and useful. Wyle will evaluate these variants to select a configuration suitable for the formal training of small unmanned aircraft systems operators, observers and payload controllers.

Wyle is a leading provider of high tech aerospace engineering and information technology services to the federal government on long-term outsourcing contracts. The company also provides biomedical and engineering services for NASA’s human space missions; test and evaluation of aircraft, weapon systems, networks, and other government assets; and other engineering services to the aerospace, defense, and nuclear power industries.

Ref.: NR/10-04

Contact:
Dan Reeder
(310) 563-6834

Source: Wyle

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Wyle Laboratories and Bearing Point win Navy SETA contract

December 28, 2007 by · Comment
Filed under: Bearing Point, Contract Awards, Wyle Labs 

This award is a classic example of a SETA contract. Science, Engineering, Technical and Analytical support contracts are given to companies to support DoD program offices in the management of their procurement programs. Here Wyle Laboratories and Bearing Point won a contract to support the E-2C office. Details are on Defenselink.mil. More information can be found here.

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