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Lockheed Martin-Built Missile Warning Satellite Encapsulated in Launch Vehicle Payload Fairing — Press Release

Lockheed Martin-Built Missile Warning Satellite Encapsulated in Launch Vehicle Payload Fairing

Team Prepares U.S. Air Force’s SBIRS GEO-1 for Early May Liftoff

CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, Fla., April 26, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — The first Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) – built Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) geosynchronous (GEO-1) spacecraft was encapsulated into its payload fairing April 20 in preparation for an early May liftoff aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla.

SBIRS GEO-1 will enhance the nation’s missile warning capabilities and improve other critical mission areas simultaneously including missile defense, technical intelligence and battlespace awareness.

The GEO-1 satellite includes highly sophisticated scanning and starring sensors that will deliver enhanced infrared sensitivity and a reduction in area revisit times over the current constellation. The scanning sensor will provide a wide area surveillance of missile launches and natural phenomena across the earth, while the staring sensor will be used to observe smaller areas of interest with enhanced sensitivity. When GEO-1 is launched, declared operational and its data is fused into the current constellation, SBIRS will deliver unprecedented, global, persistent, taskable infrared surveillance capabilities to the warfighter, nation and allies for decades to come.

The SBIRS team is led by the Infrared Space Systems Directorate at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. Lockheed Martin is the SBIRS prime contractor, with Northrop Grumman, as the payload integrator. Air Force Space Command operates the SBIRS system.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 126,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation’s 2010 sales from continuing operations were $45.8 billion.

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Navy To Christen USNS Howard O. Lorenzen

June 23, 2010 by · Comment
Filed under: Syndicated Industry News 
Navy To Christen USNS Howard O. Lorenzen
June 24, 2010

The Navy will christen the missile range instrumentation ship USNS Howard O. Lorenzen on Saturday, June 26, 2010, during a 1 p.m. CDT ceremony at VT Halter Marine in Pascagoula, Miss. The ship honors the late Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) electrical engineer who was instrumental in the creation of our nation's electronic intelligence capabilities.

Vice Adm. David J. Dorsett, deputy chief of naval operations for information dominance, willdeliver the ceremony's principal address. Susan Lorenzen Black, daughter of the ship's namesake, is the sponsor, and in accordance with Navy tradition, will break a bottle of champagne across the bow to formally christen the ship.

Considered by many to be the 'Father of Electronic Warfare,' Lorenzen's accomplishments include developments in radar, electronic countermeasures systems and intelligence satellite designs. Lorenzen led the Galactic Radiation and Background (GRAB) program, the earliest successful reconnaissance satellite program and the first electronic intelligence satellite. NRL began the classified GRAB program shortly after the U-2 incident of 1960 to obtain information on Soviet air defense radars that could not be observed by military aircraft.

Designated T-AGM 25, Howard O. Lorenzen will provide a platform for monitoring missile launches and collecting data that can be used to improve missile efficiency and accuracy. Like the Navy's two current missile range instrumentation ships – USNS Observation Island and USNS Invincible – T-AGM 25 will be operated by Military Sealift Command (MSC) and conduct missions sponsored by the Air Force.

Built by VT Halter Marine Inc., in Pascagoula, the 12,575-ton ship is 534 feet in length, with a beam of 89 feet. As part of MSC's special mission program, Howard O. Lorenzen is designated as a United States Naval Ship (USNS) and will have a combined crew of civilian mariners who will operate and navigate the ship, and military and civilian technicians from other government agencies who will operate shipboard monitoring equipment.

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Second Missile Warning Satellite Achieves Key Testing Milestone at Lockheed Martin

February 16, 2010 by · Comment
Filed under: Lockheed Martin, space, Syndicated Industry News 
Second Missile Warning Satellite Achieves Key Testing Milestone at Lockheed Martin
February 16, 2010

SUNNYVALE, Calif., -- Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) announced today that it has achieved a key integrated test milestone on the second Space-Based Infrared System (SBIRS) geosynchronous orbit (GEO-2) spacecraft at its facilities in Sunnyvale, Calif.

SBIRS is designed to provide early warning of missile launches, and simultaneously support other missions including missile defense, technical intelligence and battlespace characterization.

The GEO-2 satellite, designed to provide new missile detection and surveillance capabilities for the nation, has completed its first phase of Baseline Integrated System Test (BIST-1), an extensive functional test that characterizes the overall performance of the satellite and establishes a performance baseline for the remainder of the test program.

With the completion of BIST-1, the team will proceed with final factory work on the satellite and prepare for the final, comprehensive BIST milestone prior to entering environmental testing. The spacecraft is planned for launch aboard an Atlas V launch vehicle in 2012.

"Concluding the first phase of BIST is another example of the entire government/industry team's commitment to operational excellence and successful execution of this critical national security program," said Dave Sheridan, Lockheed Martin's SBIRS GEO program manager. "We look forward to our continued positive momentum on SBIRS and achieving mission success for our customer."

The first SBIRS spacecraft (GEO-1) completed thermal vacuum testing and is now preparing for final integration and test activities that will culminate with final checkout and delivery to the Air Force later this year.

The SBIRS team is led by the Space Based Infrared Systems Wing at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, Calif., is the SBIRS prime contractor, with Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, Azusa, Calif., as the payload integrator. Air Force Space Command operates the SBIRS system.

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New Missile Warning Satellite Built By Lockheed Martin Begins Major Environmental Test Phase

September 17, 2009 by · Comment
Filed under: Lockheed Martin, space, Syndicated Industry News 
New Missile Warning Satellite Built By Lockheed Martin Begins Major Environmental Test Phase
September 17, 2009

SUNNYVALE, Calif. -- Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) has begun thermal vacuum testing of the first Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) geosynchronous (GEO-1) satellite, a major program milestone that will validate spacecraft performance in a complete test-like-you-fly environment.

The U.S. Air Force's SBIRS program is designed to provide early warning of missile launches, and simultaneously support other missions, including missile defense, technical intelligence and battlespace awareness.

Conducted inside Lockheed Martin's Dual Entry Large Thermal Altitude (DELTA) chamber, the test will verify spacecraft functionality and performance in a vacuum environment where the satellite is stressed at the extreme hot and cold temperatures it will experience in space. The extensive test is designed to validate the overall satellite design, quality and workmanship and survivability during space vehicle launching and on-orbit operations.

"The entire team has worked extremely hard throughout our rigorous process of risk reduction and subsystem and baseline testing leading up to this critical test," said Dave Sheridan, Lockheed Martin's SBIRS GEO program director. "We look forward to executing a disciplined and thorough test and delivering this revolutionary satellite that provides vastly improved surveillance capabilities for the warfighter."

The SBIRS team is led by the Space Based Infrared Systems Wing at the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, Calif., is the SBIRS prime contractor, with Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, Azusa, Calif., as the payload integrator. Air Force Space Command operates the SBIRS system.

The team is executing to a planned schedule that supports GEO-1 delivery and launch in the beginning of fiscal year 2011 aboard an Atlas V launch vehicle.

Lockheed Martin's SBIRS contract includes the two highly elliptical orbit (HEO) payloads now on-orbit, two geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites, as well as ground-based assets to receive and process the infrared data. The team was recently awarded a $1.5-billion contract for the third HEO payload, the third GEO satellite and associated ground modifications. A contract to include a fourth HEO payload and potential fourth GEO satellite is expected to be awarded later this year.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 140,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2008 sales of $42.7 billion.

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