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Two More Littoral Combat Ships for Lockheed and Marinette Marine

The U.S. Navy in late 2010 awarded contracts to the two teams building the new Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) for ten platforms each. These were Lockheed Martin (LMT) whose mono-hull design will be built at the Marinette Marine yard in Wisconsin and Austal America in Mobile, AL. Austal America is the U.S. subsidy of Austal (ASB) the Australian manufacturer of fast ferries. The Austal design utilizes a catamaran hull.

Prior to these contracts each team was building two of the small warships. They have received orders under the new contract for two more and last week the Navy issued Lockheed a contract worth about $700 million for two more. This brings the total of LCS under order from Lockheed to six.

The Navy ultimately plans to operate 30 or more of the ships. They are designed to be equipped with different mission packages depending on the requirements. This includes anti-air, anti-ship and mind warfare among others. Like their name implies they are optimized for in-shore activities such as anti-piracy operations in the Indian Ocean and special warfare.

Even though the defense budget is being cut the Navy remains committed to building substantial numbers of the ship. The fact that it is built in smaller yards allows such construction.

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Raytheon Supports U.S. Navy Ship Production with SSDS

The U.S. Navy is still building new ships and retrofitting older ones. The future may not be so bright as budget pressures and cuts reduce the number of ships built and in service but currently contracts signed several years ago are being executed. The Navy has under construction aircraft carriers, DDG-1000 and DDG-51 destroyers, the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) and the San Antonio class amphibious warfare ships as well as numerous support ships and smaller vessels.

These all need weapons, sensors and command and control systems. Raytheon (RTN) manufactures radars, missiles and the Ship Self-Defense System (SSDS) combat management system.

Photo from AdsitAdventures’ Flickr Photostream.

The SSDS MK 2 is currently in production and is being installed on aircraft carriers and the San Antonio class. Raytheon delivered the last one from the FY2010 contract for support of LPD-26, the USS John P. Murtha, this week. 5 systems were part of that contract and 30 in total have been delivered to the U.S. Navy.

Not only does Raytheon build the hardware for the system but they continue to provide engineering services and develop the SSDS to integrate new sensors and weapons as well as upgrade previous installations.

The U.S. Navy intends to build several more carriers and LPD class ships which will require SSDS or the next evolution of the system. There will also be demands to retrofit the system to older ships which will aid Raytheon if and when the naval construction budget is cut.

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GD to Begin Design of Mine Warfare System for Littoral Combat Ships (LCS)

The Navy’s new Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) are small combatants that are optimized for missions in-shore. They are being designed to operate different modules depending on the missions that will add to and expand the capabilities of their standard gun and helicopter armament. One primary mission for them will be reconnaissance and clearing of minefields.

Currently there are over 20 LCS on order from two different builders who are offering two different designs. Lockheed Martin (LMT) and Willamette Marine are building a more traditional hull design while Austal USA, part of the Australian shipbuilder Austal, is offering a trimaran hull based on fast ferries they have previously built. Lockheed’s ships are being built in Wisconsin and Austal in Alabama. The decision to use two suppliers means that the LCS will be built and in service rather quickly.

Even though the two designs are very dissimilar they will operate the same weapons and combat modules. These will include ones that provide capabilities for the anti-air mission, to attack ships and mine warfare. The modules will be designed to plug into the ships.

Now General Dynamics (GD) has been awarded a contract to begin developing one of the mine warfare systems for the LCS. This is the Surface Mine Countermeasure Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (SMCUUV) which is an autonomous system that will be used to search and classify mines. It will also collect environmental data to support operations. The contract has an initial value of $87 million.

More details about the SMCUUV may be found at the U.S. Navy’s website here.

The key to the LCS will be the ability to develop these modules and make sure that they work efficiently with the two different designs of ships.

Photo of the Austal design from Surfaces Forces’ Flickr Photostream.

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U.S. Navy Awards General Dynamics $87 Million for Unmanned Underwater Mine Countermeasure Vehicle — Press Release

U.S. Navy Awards General Dynamics $87 Million for Unmanned Underwater Mine Countermeasure Vehicle

Protecting ships and sailors with modernized underwater mine hunting capability

FAIRFAX, Va., Nov. 9, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Navy’s Naval Sea Systems Command has awarded General Dynamics Advanced Informational Systems a contract to design and build the Surface Mine Countermeasure Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (SMCM UUV) system. The system will initially be a part of the Littoral Combat Ship Mine Warfare mission package. The contract has a maximum potential value of $86.7 million for one Engineering Development Model (EDM) and five low-rate initial production systems if all options are exercised. General Dynamics Advanced Informational Systems is a business unit of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD).

The SMCM UUV system will allow Navy commanders and sailors to reliably detect and identify mines in high-clutter underwater environments in a single pass, including mines that are suspended in the ocean, resting on the sea floor or buried. Additionally, it will gather environmental data that can provide intelligence support for other mine warfare systems.

“General Dynamics continues to deliver affordable, flexible solutions that meet the Navy’s vision for open architecture,” said Lou Von Thaer, president of General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems. “Commanders and sailors will now have the most capable and advanced system available to detect, avoid and defeat mine threats.”

General Dynamics will use an open systems architecture approach to ensure the SMCM UUV will have the flexibility to be integrated into missions on Littoral Combat Ships, as well as other ship types. The Navy’s evolving and dynamic mission requirements call for a design that allows “plug and play” integration for ship’s systems and mission modules. These interchangeable packages of specialized equipment allow the Navy to quickly reconfigure a ship for changing mission requirements.

General Dynamics plans to hire 10 new employees to support this contract. The development and manufacturing will be done in Greensboro, N.C., Fairfax, Va., Quincy, Mass., Braintree, Mass., and Panama City, Fla.

The General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems team includes Bluefin Robotics, Quincy, Mass.; Ultra Electronics Ocean Systems, Braintree, Mass.; and Oceaneering International, Houston, TX.

The program office for this contract is the Unmanned Maritime Systems Program Office (PMS 406), one of six program offices within the Navy’s Program Executive Office, Littoral Combat Ship (PEO LCS).

For more information about General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, visit www.gd-ais.com.

More information about General Dynamics is available online at www.generaldynamics.com.

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Navy Continues LCS Production with Orders for Both Teams

Earlier this year the U.S. Navy had gone ahead and awarded contracts to the two builders of the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) for up to ten ships of their designs. The LCS is a new small warship that will be the a largest class of ships built over the next few decades for the Navy.

Two teams one lead by Lockheed Martin (LMT) and the other by Austal America (ASB:AUS) are building the ships. Lockheed uses the Wisconsin based Marinette Marine as their shipbuilder and Austal utilizes their yard in Mobile, AL. Each team had orders for two but the new contracts increased that to up to 12.

Now the Navy is allocating funding for the ships under these contracts with Lockheed and Marinette receiving a contract for the second ship of their order of ten, LCS 7, which will be named the U.S.S. Detroit. The ships are expected to cost upwards of $400 million when completed but the contract is for about $375 million. The Navy had previously ordered LCS 5, the U.S.S. Milwaukee.

Austal has completed U.S.S. Independence (LCS 2) and is building the U.S.S. Coronado (LCS 4). They received an order for a further LCS at the same time Lockheed did which is worth about $368 million. This should be for LCS 8 but no name or number was given.

The subsidiary of the Australian maker of high speed ferries and other ships had earlier received a contract for engineering support worth about $20 million while Lockheed received one as well worth a little more.

The Navy had originally planned to use multiple sources for the LCS due to the need for the rapid construction of so many ships. This acquisition strategy went through some changes with at one point the Service planning a single source for the second batch after the delivery of the first four ships. Due to the competitive bids received from Lockheed and Austal the Navy asked Congress for permission to use two sources which was approved late last year. This led to the similar contracts for ten ships each.

The Navy has had plans to build upwards of fifty of the ships which while they have dissimilar hull designs carry the same basic payload of weapons and sensors. The ships will conduct a variety of missions including patrol, anti-submarine warfare and mine warfare.

Photo from uscgantareapa flickr photostream.

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BAE Systems to Build Gun Systems for U.S. Navy Littoral Combat Ships

January 20, 2011 by · Comment
Filed under: Syndicated Industry News 

ARLINGTON, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–As the country’s leading naval guns producer, BAE Systems will provide the primary gun systems on 10 U.S. Navy Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) to be built by the Lockheed Martin-led team. BAE Systems will equip the 10 ships with 57 millimeter Mk 110 gun systems. “We’re very happy to be part of the LCS program,” said Gary Slack, president of BAE Systems U.S. Combat Systems. “We look forward to furnishing these dynamic new ships with the absolute best in naval gun tech



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Rolls-Royce to Power Ten Littoral Combat Ships for the US Navy

January 17, 2011 by · Comment
Filed under: Syndicated Industry News 

RESTON, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Rolls-Royce, the global power systems company, will supply gas turbines and waterjets for ten of the US Navy’s Littoral Combat Ships – the Group’s largest ever marine naval surface ship contract.



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General Dynamics to Deliver Open Architecture-based Combat Systems for 10 Littoral Combat Ships — Press Release

General Dynamics to Deliver Open Architecture-based Combat Systems for 10 Littoral Combat Ships

New contract award could create as many as 500 jobs for General Dynamics as the Systems Integrator for the Independence-class Littoral Combat Ships and validates the company’s open architecture-based approach.

PR Newswire

FAIRFAX, Va., Jan. 3, 2011

FAIRFAX, Va., Jan. 3, 2011 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems has been awarded a contract by Austal USA to be the Platform Systems Engineering Agent (PSEA) of the Independence-class Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). The initial contract award is for one ship, with nine additional ships in the following five years. The work on the initial contract will be performed through 2014. General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems is a business unit of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD).

As the PSEA, General Dynamics is responsible for the design, integration and testing of the ship’s combat and seaframe control systems. The General Dynamics combat and seaframe control systems are based on an open architecture computing infrastructure, known as OPEN CI. It ensures the most innovative and affordable solutions are incorporated into the systems in rapid, affordable spiral development cycles. The seamless integration of these solutions dramatically lowers acquisition and lifecycle costs while addressing the Navy’s evolving and dynamic mission requirements.

“We will continue to deliver an affordable, flexible combat capability that meets the Navy’s vision for open architecture and helps ensure that Navy warfighters have the most capable and advanced systems available,” said Lou Von Thaer, president, General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems.

OPEN CI provides a highly flexible information technology backbone that allows “plug and play” integration for the ship’s systems and its mission modules, which are interchangeable packages of specialized equipment that allow the Navy to quickly reconfigure the ship for changing mission requirements. The system meets Navy open architecture requirements, it strictly adheres to published industry standards and facilitates the integration of best-in-class commercially available products.

“General Dynamics developed a flexible and non-proprietary approach to systems integration that provides the Navy with increased capability at a lower cost,” said Mike Tweed-Kent, vice president and general manager of General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems Mission Integration Systems division. “Our team of engineers took an innovative approach to meet the Navy’s requirements using leading edge technologies, such as any-display-anywhere systems, to reduce manpower and to rapidly deliver new and more powerful capabilities to the fleet. This approach has proven itself on the USS Independence and we will continue to bring new innovations to bear throughout the lifecycle of the Littoral Combat Ship program.”

This contract could create more than 500 additional jobs with General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems in Pittsfield, Mass., as well as in Mobile, Ala., Virginia, North Carolina, New Jersey and California. Additionally, this work will continue to support more than 450 LCS suppliers across the country, including 97 located in Massachusetts.

Tweed-Kent added, “On behalf of General Dynamics, we thank our employees and our teammates – BAE Systems, General Dynamics Armament and Technical Products, L-3 Communications, Northrop Grumman and Sensis Corporation – for their contributions to this award.”

General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems is a provider of end-to-end intelligence and cyber solutions and mission systems integration to customers in the defense, intelligence and homeland security communities. More information is available online at www.gd-ais.com.

General Dynamics, headquartered in Falls Church, Va., employs approximately 90,000 people worldwide. The company is a market leader in business aviation; land and expeditionary combat systems, armaments and munitions; shipbuilding and marine systems; and information systems and technologies. More information about General Dynamics is available online at www.generaldynamics.com.

SOURCE General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems

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Navy Wastes No Time and Gives New LCS Contracts to Lockheed, Austal

With the split buy acquisition strategy approved by Congress the U.S. Navy wasted no time and ordered up to twenty more of the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) from its two suppliers.

This week both the teams led by Lockheed Martin (LMT) and Austal America (ASB:AUS) received contracts for one ship plus up to nine more options. As Congress allowed the Navy went out and bought up to twenty ships. Each contract is worth between $460 and $500 million for the first ships. If all twenty are built the two teams will received close to $5 billion each.

While each team is building a dissimilar hull shape the two designs carry similar weapon loads. Lockheed is partnered with Marinette Marine’s yard in Wisconsin. Austal America is building their ships at their facility in Mobile, AL. The ships are designed to be built at smaller yards allowing more rapid construction.

So far the Navy has received three LCS ships. USS Freedom (LCS 1) and USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) were built by Lockheed Martin and USS Independence (LCS 2) by Austal America. The USS Coronado (LCS 4) is under construction in Mobile and is expected to be commissioned in 2012.

If all twenty ships are ordered and delivered under these contracts the LCS class will quickly become one of the largest in the current Navy. Ultimately up to fifty or more of the LCS could be acquired.

The decision to allow the split contracts in line with the original acquisition strategy for the ship rather then just using one source as the Navy had proposed when it restructured the program in 2009 is a boon to Austal and Marinette. Both companies had been planning layoffs and restructuring if they had not one the contract. Now they both will have to ramp up their capabilities to support the Navy’s program.

Photo from avhell’s flickr photostream.

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Latest CRA Allows Navy to Use Multiple Sources for LCS

In the on again off again tale of the Navy’s new small combatant Congress approved the revised acquisition strategy of using multiple sources for the next twenty ships. In the latest Continuing Resolution Authority (CRA) passed by Congress Tuesday and signed by President Obama the Navy is given permission to buy ten Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) from Lockheed Martin (LMT) and Austal America (ASB:AU).

Lockheed will team with Marinette Marine Corp. of Michigan while Austal originally worked with General Dynamics (GD) for the first four LCS but for this round of bidding submitted their own. General Dynamics had decided that for future contracts they might bid by themselves.

Ten days ago the Navy had asked the two bidders to extend their prices while asking Congress for this change in strategy from the plan to buy the next batch of LCS from a sole source. The prices offered were so good that the Navy had decided to try and return to the original LCS acquisition strategy of multiple sources.

Because the plan is to buy fifty or more of the ships the idea of having two or more builders of the small ship would maximize the number being delivered. While the two hull designs are very dissimilar the overall combat load out is the same. The LCS will be optimized for fighting close to shore and be able to carry different equipment so that it may carry out missions such as mine sweeping, anti-piracy as well as fighting other ships and submarines.

The decision is a boon to the U.S. ship building industry as it guarantees work at least for the next few years to two yards rather then one.

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Coast Guard Orders fourth National Security Cutter from Northrop Grumman

Despite their potential plans to exit the shipbuilding business as well as moving ahead with closing some of their existing shipyards Northrop Grumman (NOC) still is receiving contracts for new ships. This is on top of their existing work refitting U.S. Navy aircraft carriers and other ships as well as participating in the building of amphibious ships and destroyers.

The latest contract they received was from the U.S. Coast Guard who ordered the fourth National Security Cutter (NSC) from the company. This contract is worth almost five hundred million dollars. So far two of the ships have been delivered with a third under construction.

The National Security or Legend class cutter is one of the new ships, aircraft and other systems that the U.S.C.G. included in their Deepwater System program to provide major upgrades to their capability. They are large ships with comprehensive electronic systems and have high speed and long range to enable them to patrol a larger area more efficiently.

Northrop has used the NSC hull and design as the basis for a rapidly available frigate design offered to the U.S. Navy. This would be used to support the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) under construction by General Dynamics (GD) and Lockheed Martin (LMT).

The U.S. demand for combat ships is being reduced and further budget pressure may reduce them even more. This has led Northrop to discuss exiting the shipbuilding business completely. There have already been companies offering to buy the capability but the large defense contractor has yet to move on the sale.

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Acquisition Reform and Budget Machinations Begin to Affect Programs

Updated to change competitor to Austal USA and General Dynamics vice Northrop Grumman in the first contest.

The U.S. Defense Department has been warning that flat or smaller budgets may be on the horizon. At the same time led by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates the Department is working to promote efficiencies in contracting and acquisition. These two factors seem to have start affecting some program decisions.

The U.S. Navy just announced that they are delaying the decision on who has won the new contract to build Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). Two bids were submitted for ten ships by Lockheed Martin (LM) and Austal USA, part of Austal (ASB:AU) of Australia. A decision was supposed to be announced this month but that has been delayed three-to-six months now. The whole LCS acquisition strategy was changed last year when a plan to have General Dynamics (GD) and Lockheed each build large numbers of two completely different designs for the LCS mission was ended after four ships were built. Now there will be this competition and then a further one in 2012 for up to 55 ships. The delay has reportedly been caused by a need for the Navy to have further discussions with the bidders. Then final proposals will be submitted. Some theories about the delay are a need by the Navy to try and make the award protest proof or costs need to be refined to meet reduced future spending. Either way a delay in the award will in the short term affect both bidders as it delays potential revenue and planning for the contract.

The Army announced yesterday that they have put on hold the ongoing competition for a new ground vehicle capable of transporting infantry across battlefields. This program had just received bids from three industry teams. The new GCV program was started due to the cancellation of the Future Combat System (FCS) by the Army in 2009. The Service stated that it may need to change the terms of the proposal after conducting a full review this Spring. That may mean requirements are being changed or cost again is driving a need to change quantities and schedule. It looks like the bidders may have to submit whole new proposals. If this is required the program would be set back several months as it would take time to redo the proposals and the source selection would be extended.

Another program facing scrutiny by Gates and his staff is the U.S. Marines new Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV). This is a armored vehicle designed to carry troops quickly from Navy amphibious ships to the beach and beyond. It will replace the venerable LVTP-7 system that has been in use since the 1970’s. Over the last decade the EFV has survived other reviews despite is cost and difficult requirements. In terms of big ticket items that are attractive to the budget hawks the EFV is certainly attractive. It has had a long development profile and the total cost of the system is high. The Marines though have a need to replace the large, slow LVTP for several years and the if the EFV was canceled a new program would have to be restarted to meet this mission. It may be that the Pentagon ends up seeing this one through.

There have been many concerns expressed over the last two years that the U.S. budget situation will adversely affect the Department of Defense. Unlike in past budget cycles Gates has remained committed to investing in some modernization programs. His recent plan to free up $100 billion over ten years from efficiencies and service contracts is not to cut the budget but to plow back into these programs. The problem he and the U.S. military face may be that there is only so much money available so only select programs get funded. The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and KC-X aerial tanker for example will eat up a large amount of these funds. These program decisions may be a reflection of that situation.

Photo from avhell flickr photostream.

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Northrop Grumman Delivers Mine Detection Pods Ahead of Schedule

Northrop Grumman Delivers Mine Detection Pods Ahead of Schedule
April 27, 2010

BETHPAGE, N.Y. –– Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) delivered, ahead of schedule, all Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP) lot 2 Airborne Laser Mine Detection System (ALMDS) pods to the U.S. Navy.

The last of the three ALMDS LRIP lot 2 pods was accepted by the Navy on March 11. The company delivered the pods approximately three weeks ahead of schedule, on average. The company and the Navy are in the final stages of submitting the LRIP lot 3 production contract.

"The Northrop Grumman contractor team and our Navy partners are working hard to get these systems into the fleet as quickly as possible," said Dan Chang, vice president of Northrop Grumman Maritime and Tactical Systems. "ALMDS and the Rapid Airborne Mine Clearance System (RAMICS) are critical tools with demonstrated technologies for getting our warfighters out of minefields. These two programs are key to the fielding of the entire mine detection and destruction capability to our warfighters."

Mounted on the left side of an MH-60 helicopter, ALMDS rapidly detects and locates floating and submerged mines so they can be neutralized before they can damage U.S. and allied military and commercial ships. The system uses pulsed laser light and streak tube receivers housed in an external equipment pod to image the entire near-surface volume area of the sea in 3-D. The ALMDS is capable of day or night operations.

Eventually, ALMDS will be coupled with Northrop Grumman's RAMICS, which is now in development. RAMICS, also operating from an MH-60S helicopter, will take the mine location information from ALMDS, relocate the mine and then neutralize the mine with its 30 mm gun. Both of these systems are an integral part of the Mine Counter Measures (MCM) Mission Package, which will be deployed on the Littoral Combat Ships. Northrop Grumman is also the LCS Mission Package Integrator for the Navy.

Northrop Grumman, which developed and produces the ALMDS at its Melbourne, Fla., facility, was able to make the early deliveries through the teamwork of its customer teammates and supplier base: Naval Sea Systems Command PMS 495; the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division, Panama City, Fla.; and, the Defense Contracts Management Agency; Areté Associates, Tucson, Ariz., which manufactures the Receiver Sensor Assembly; Cutting Edge Optronics, a Northrop Grumman subsidiary in St. Charles, Mo., which manufactures the high-powered laser transmitter; CPI Aero, Edgewood, N.Y., manufacturer of the pod housing; Curtiss Wright/DY4, San Diego, manufacturer of the central electronics chassis; and Meggitt Defense Systems, Irvine, Calif., which produces the environmental control system.

Northrop Grumman's Melbourne facility is the company's Center of Excellence for Airborne Mine Countermeasures and is currently under contract for the development or manufacture of the U.S. Department of Defense's four Airborne Mine Countermeasures sensor programs.
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Nation’s First Littoral Combat Ship Departs For Maiden Deployment

February 16, 2010 by · Comment
Filed under: Lockheed Martin, Syndicated Industry News 
Nation's First Littoral Combat Ship Departs For Maiden Deployment
February 16, 2010 3:30:00 PM

For a complete listing of our news releases, please click here

MAYPORT, Fla., -- The nation's first Littoral Combat Ship, USS Freedom (LCS 1), departed from Naval Station Mayport, FL, today for its maiden deployment, approximately two years ahead of schedule. The agile 378-foot USS Freedom, designed and built by a Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT)-led industry team, will deploy to the Southern Command area of responsibility.

"We congratulate the USS Freedom and her crew on their maiden deployment as this new class of Littoral Combat Ships begins to fulfill important global security missions," said Lockheed Martin Chairman and CEO Bob Stevens. "Her quality and proven performance enabled Freedom's deployment two years ahead of schedule, a significant accomplishment in naval shipbuilding. As we compete to build additional ships for the U.S. Navy, the Lockheed Martin team remains focused on delivering an affordable surface combatant with the flexibility to provide security close to shore and on the open seas."

USS Freedom (LCS 1) is the first of 55 the Navy plans for a new class of ships designed to operate in coastal waters. The ship's capabilities have been demonstrated since delivered to the U.S. Navy in 2008. Freedom has sailed more than 10,000 nm, successfully completed sea trials and demonstrated performance of combat, communications and other critical systems.

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Raytheon-Developed Unmanned Ground Control System Completes Major Milestone — Press Release

November 20, 2009 by · Comment
Filed under: Companies, Press Releases, Raytheon 

Raytheon-Developed Unmanned Ground Control System Completes Major Milestone

Adding Tactical Control System will enhance future Navy missions

FALLS CHURCH, Va., Nov. 19, 2009 /PRNewswire/ — Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) achieved a key milestone for the U.S. Navy as the Tactical Control System (TCS) was deployed recently on the USS McInerney to support a counternarcotics mission in Central America as part of the MQ-8B Fire Scout program.

“This truly is a critical milestone on our road to success toward a full fleet introduction on Littoral Combat Ships,” said Capt. Tim Dunigan, U.S. Navy. “Deploying Fire Scout aboard the USS McInerney will allow for the continued maturation of our system while increasing the warfighting effectiveness of the ship.”

The U.S. Navy TCS system provides an opportunity to develop a low-risk, low-cost and effective common ground control system for full range of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) across multiple agencies. TCS is the only system that exhibits key enablers such as common system framework, open documented interfaces and air-certified software, while giving the government unlimited rights necessary to develop UAS control across the spectrum of missions, applications and air vehicles.

“This is a huge step for the TCS program,” said Ravindra Nirgudkar, program manager for Raytheon’s Tactical Control System. “This deployment solidifies TCS’ position as the future ground control system not only for the U.S. Navy but also with other services.”

Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems is a leading provider of intelligence and information solutions, specializing in ground processing, unmanned ground systems, cybersecurity solutions, homeland security and other markets to resolve the most complex problems for its customers worldwide. IIS had 2008 revenues of $3.1 billion and employs more than 9,000 engineering and technical professionals worldwide.

Raytheon Company with 2008 sales of $23.2 billion, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, homeland security and other government markets throughout the world. With a history of innovation spanning 87 years, Raytheon provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration and other capabilities in the areas of sensing; effects; and command, control, communications and intelligence systems, as well as a broad range of mission support services. With headquarters in Waltham, Mass., Raytheon employs 73,000 people worldwide.

Contact:
Keith Little
703.849.1675

Source: Raytheon Company

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