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Lockheed Martin Expands Facility for F-35 Component Manufacturing in Pinellas Park, Fla. — Press Release

Lockheed Martin Expands Facility for F-35 Component Manufacturing in Pinellas Park, Fla.

PINELLAS PARK, Fla., Feb. 22, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Lockheed Martin’s (NYSE:LMT) operation in Pinellas Park officially opened a new 57,000 square foot manufacturing facility today to produce aircraft canopy components for the F-35 Lighting II fighter.

The new facility is an annex to Lockheed Martin’s existing 197,000 square foot building that has been producing structural components for more than 10 different types of aircraft since 1997. The operation began with 80 employees and has since grown to its current workforce of 250, with additional jobs expected as the F-35 program moves toward peak production. The expanded facility can support production of up to 20 F-35 canopy units a month.

In remarks at the event, Harry Glenn, chief of staff for U.S. Rep. Bill Young, chair of the House Appropriations subcommittee on defense, said, “The Lockheed Martin Pinellas facility has distinguished itself with its quality, safety and efficiency and has become a center of excellence for the manufacturing of F-35 canopies.”

Aircraft canopy components include the “windshield” of the aircraft – a clear plastic bubble – and the frame, ejection pyrotechnics and other structures that support it.

The F-35 is expected to be one of the largest military aircraft programs in history, including thousands of aircraft to be produced for world air forces over several decades. The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th Generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

Core competencies at the Pinellas facility include sheet metal and extrusion fabrication and structural subassembly. To date the facility has produced components for the C-130J, F-22, F-16, C-5 and P-3, in addition to the F-35. Besides supporting Lockheed Martin aircraft programs, the facility does work for several other companies.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 123,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation’s net sales for 2011 were $46.5 billion.

For additional information, visit our Web site:

http://www.lockheedmartin.com

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Lockheed to Continue Support for the F-22

Update – Lockheed Martin put out a statement earlier today that the award was not a new contract but an addition to their existing one that raised the ceiling to the $7.4 billion amount.

One of the advantages that the OEM for a defense systems has is that they have the ability to win the majority of work on a produced and fielded articles. This is especially true for aircraft. The U.S. and many other countries rarely buy full technical rights to a defense program now due to the cost. This means that they have to rely on the OEM for modifications, improvements and other support.

In this vein, Lockheed Martin (LMT), the primary contractor on the F-22 Raptor fighter program just received a long term contract form the U.S. Air Force to provide this kind of effort for that fleet. Lockheed has delivered over 100 of the 5th Generation fighter aircraft and continues to produce them now although the U.S. is not ordering any more.

The contract has a value of over $7 billion and will allow system upgrades and performance improvements. As with many of these contracts it was sole source.

In the past the military has taken aircraft and helicopters into their maintenance and support systems. When BRAC started in the 1990’s one of the first areas targeted were the large depots and shipyards owned by the government. Many of these were closed and the work turned over to contractors either at their facilities or the former government ones. Many times contractors are hired to work at existing government facilities as well.

The F-22 while it is the most advanced combat aircraft in the world has had some recent problems. Along with many U.S. aircraft there were found to be issues with its Onboard Oxygen Generating System (OBOGS). This lead to the fleet being grounded while work was done to solve the issue.

Lockheed will work under this contract on improvements to the aircraft which could be new engines, electronics, software and integration of weapons as the fleet ages. It could also look at maintenance, reliability and availability enhancements. These contracts are not uncommon especially as production begins to wind down. They represent a good way for a company to continue making earnings and revenue off of a system in service.

Photo from Rob Shenk’s Flickr photostream.

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Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test Program Shows Progress in First Quarter — Press Release

Lockheed Martin F-35 Flight Test Program Shows Progress in First Quarter

FORT WORTH, Texas, April 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) F-35 Lightning II test jets made considerable flight test progress during the first quarter of 2011, conducting 199 test flights versus a plan of 142 flights. Additionally, the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) variant logged six times more vertical landings in the first quarter than in all of 2010. The test program remained ahead of plan despite the grounding of various test fleet aircraft for 4-15 days during the period as officials investigated the cause of a dual generator/starter failure during a flight on March 9.

The following totals and highlights provide a snapshot of flight test activity in the first quarter:

Conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL: F-35A) aircraft conducted 82 flights against the plan of 62.
STOVL (F-35B) aircraft conducted 101 flights against a plan of 62.
Carrier variant aircraft accomplished 16 flights of 18 planned.
Two production-model aircraft, AF-6 and AF-7, flew for the first time in preparation for delivery to the U.S. Air Force this year. AF-6 and AF-7 flew seven times in the first quarter.
The STOVL variant performed 61 vertical landings (compared with 10 vertical landings in all of 2010). BF-1 performed the first touch-and-go maneuver in VL mode this quarter.
From the start of flight testing in December 2006 through March 31, 2011, F-35s have flown 753 times, including production-model flights.

The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 132,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation’s 2010 sales from continuing operations were $45.8 billion.

For additional information, visit our websites:

http://www.lockheedmartin.com

http://www.codeonemagazine.com

SOURCE Lockheed Martin Aeronautics

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Lockheed Martin F-35 Program Achieves Overall 2010 Flight Test Target — Press Release

Lockheed Martin F-35 Program Achieves Overall 2010 Flight Test Target

FORT WORTH, Texas, Dec. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire/ — On Thursday, Dec. 9, the Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) F-35 Lightning II program team reached its 2010 goal of 394 test flights jointly established by the Joint Strike Fighter Program Office and Lockheed Martin. Since the first flight of the F-35 on Dec. 15, 2006, the program has logged a total of 531 flights, expanding the performance envelope of the three F-35 variants and testing the mission systems.

“We exceeded our 394-flight goal and expect to meet our overall test-point goal this year by reaching ahead and working 2011 test points,” said J.D. McFarlan, Lockheed Martin vice president of F-35 Test and Verification. “While we are still behind on our overall STOVL variant testing, we are working through a plan to get us back on track.”

In November, the program completed 60 flights against a plan of 51. Both the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) and the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variants exceeded their monthly flight targets. The F-35C carrier variant (CV) jet fell just two flights short of its plan.

The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and advanced sustainment. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 133,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation’s 2009 sales from continuing operations were $44.0 billion.

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Lockheed Martin F-35 Ground-Test Article Completes Testing Five Months Ahead of Schedule

Lockheed Martin F-35 Ground-Test Article Completes Testing Five Months Ahead of Schedule
June 9, 2010

FORT WORTH, Texas, -The Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) F-35 Lightning II program successfully completed F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) full-scale static testing - with zero structural failures - five months ahead of schedule and in less than half the time of legacy programs.

The test program was conducted on AG-1, an F-35A dedicated to validating the strength of the jet's airframe.

During testing, the strength and stability of the aircraft structure were verified to 150 percent of design limits or 13.5 G's (force of gravity), with 174 critical load conditions, or pressures, applied to the airframe to evaluate its structural integrity. Testing was conducted predominantly at BAE Systems' Structural & Dynamic Test Laboratory in Brough, England. The U.K. tests began in August 2009 and were accomplished in 295 days - a rate that exceeded the record-setting pace previously established by the F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing static test program.

Mick Ord, BAE Systems managing director for the F-35 program, said, "This was a major milestone, and the test results demonstrate that the F-35 has a fantastic airframe. As a principal subcontractor to Lockheed Martin, one of the capabilities BAE Systems brings to the F-35 programme is our structural test expertise. The structural and dynamic test facility at Brough is a centre of excellence in the U.K. Our team has performed admirably to complete the test schedule on AG-1 ahead of program."

The F-35 Lightning II 5th generation fighter combines advanced stealth with supersonic speed and high agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and lower operational and support costs. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with principal industrial partners Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

The F-35 program has about 900 suppliers in 43 states, and directly and indirectly employs more than 130,000 people. Thousands more are employed in the F-35 partner countries, which have invested more than $4 billion in the project. Those countries are the United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Australia, Denmark and Norway.

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U.S. Navy Version of Lockheed Martin F-35 Makes First Flight

U.S. Navy Version of Lockheed Martin F-35 Makes First Flight
June 7, 2010

FORT WORTH, Texas, -The most advanced aircraft in the history of the United States Navy made its inaugural flight today, assuring a future of long-range, first-day-of-the-war stealth striking capability from the Navy's big-deck carriers. The first Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) F-35C Lightning II carrier variant took off from Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base at 11:46 a.m. and logged a 57 min flight.

"I am thrilled the F-35C has attained this milestone," said Vice Adm. Thomas J. Kilcline, Commander of Naval Air Forces. "This flight marks the beginning of a new chapter in Naval Aviation. The mission systems in this aircraft will provide the Carrier Strike Group Commander with an unprecedented ability to counter a broad spectrum of threats and win in operational scenarios that our legacy aircraft cannot address.

"As a long-range, stealthy, carrier-based aircraft, the F-35C will provide Naval Aviators a fifth-generation fighter with the most advanced technology possible to perform our nation's missions. I look forward to the F-35C's continued progress, and observing developmental flight testing at Patuxent River later this summer," Kilcline said.

The F-35C is unique in its uncompromised carrier suitability, with a larger wing and control surfaces for safe, precise handling and low approach speeds to the carrier, excellent over-the-nose visibility, and additional structural strength for at-sea operations. The aircraft's stealth materials are designed to withstand harsh carrier conditions with minimal maintenance.

"For the first time ever, and from now on, wherever on the world's oceans we position a 98,000-ton nuclear carrier, we can launch a long-range, lethal, stealth strike fighter with the ability to defeat the most sophisticated air defenses," said Tom Burbage, Lockheed Martin executive vice president and general manager of F-35 Program Integration. "Today's flight marks the beginning of the true introduction of a next-generation weapon system capable of providing joint, coalition striking power on Day One, from both land and sea bases."

Today's mission was flown by Lockheed Martin Test Pilot Jeff Knowles, a retired Naval Aviator and test pilot who flew F-14As and F-14Ds operationally, and who served as chief test pilot on the F-117 stealth fighter program.

The F-35 program has about 900 suppliers in 43 states, and directly and indirectly employs more than 130,000 people. Thousands more are employed in the F-35 partner countries, which have invested more than $4 billion in the project. Those countries are the United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Australia, Denmark and Norway.

The F-35 Lightning II 5th generation fighter combines advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations and lower operational and support costs. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with principal industrial partners Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems. Two separate, interchangeable F-35 engines are under development: the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team F136.

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Lockheed Martin, Magestic Systems, Nikon Metrology Win Innovation Award for F-35 Program

Lockheed Martin, Magestic Systems, Nikon Metrology Win Innovation Award for F-35 Program
April 26, 2010 11:19 AM

FORT WORTH, Texas, --Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT), jointly with Magestic Systems, Inc. (MSI) and Nikon Metrology, has won a first-place JEC Innovation Award in composites manufacturing for technology used in the production of the F-35 Lightning II stealth fighter.

The 2010 JEC Innovation Award was presented in Paris in recognition of the cured laminate compensation (CLC) process - an innovative composite manufacturing solution for achieving precision, as-built laminate thickness without costly post-cure machining. This new metrology-assisted process is used in the production of composite parts for the F-35 and was developed specifically to pre-measure and correct the thickness of cured composite wing skins for the F-35. The technology will result in significant cost savings to Lockheed Martin and its F-35 global supply network.

"The award spotlights a highly innovative process in the most innovative fighter production system ever devised," said Mike Packer, Lockheed Martin vice president of Manufacturing Strategy & Processes. "This process increases production of right-first-time composite parts, using both MSI's Ply Compensation(TM) System (PCS(TM)) and Nikon Metrology's Laser Radar technology."

The award was presented at an April 13 ceremony during the opening of the JEC Show in Paris. A jury of renowned international experts selected the best composite innovations, based on their technical interest, market potential, partnership, financial impact and originality. The JEC Show is JEC Composites' annual conference focused on the application and advancement of composites. JEC Composites is the leading network supporting the global composite industry.

The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations, advanced sustainment, and lower operational and support costs. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems. Two separate, interchangeable F-35 engines are under development: the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team F136.

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Northrop Grumman Salutes First Flight of First F-35 Mission Systems Aircraft

Northrop Grumman Salutes First Flight of First F-35 Mission Systems Aircraft
April 8, 2010

STOVL Variant is First F-35 to Carry Electronic Systems That Provide Mission Capabilities

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. -- Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) today congratulated F-35 Lightning II prime contractor Lockheed Martin (NYSE:LMT) for successfully completing the inaugural flight of the first F-35 mission systems aircraft.

The flight of the F-35 designated BF-4, a short take off, vertical landing (STOVL) variant, commenced April 7 at 10:04 a.m. CDT from Lockheed Martin's Fort Worth plan, and lasted approximately 55 minutes. It was piloted by Lockheed Martin F-35 Test Pilot David Nelson.

The flight of BF-4 marks the first time an F-35 has flown with mission-enabling sensor systems, including the Northrop Grumman-developed fire-control radar, and integrated communications, navigation, identification avionics. The company, a principal and founding member of the Lockheed Martin F-35 industry team, also builds the center fuselage for all three F-35 variants and provides key mission systems software and related test equipment.

"The first flight of BF-4 is good news for the warfighter," said Mark A. Tucker, vice president of tactical systems and the F-35 program manager for Northrop Grumman's Aerospace Systems sector. "It means the flight test program is now expanding from simply testing the flying characteristics of this fifth generation fighter, to testing the systems that will deliver the F-35's multi-role value to the U.S. and its allies."

Northrop Grumman is proud of the role it plays helping Lockheed Martin ensure that the F-35 meets the critical mission requirements not only of the U.S. Department of Defense, but also of the F-35 partner countries and potential international customers, added Tucker. Lockheed Martin is the F-35 mission systems integrator.

The company provides missions systems software used to perform several critical F-35 functions: external communications, which includes training, landing and maintenance data links; sensor planning; mission management; embedded training; and health monitoring of on-board mission systems. It also develops and produces the test station equipment used by the entire industry team to develop and test F-35 mission systems software.

Northrop Grumman also produces the aircraft's AN/APG-81 active electronically scanned array fire control radar. It allows the pilot to engage air and ground targets at long range, and provides situational awareness. To date, the company has conducted extensive flight testing
of the radar on other platforms with very positive results.

Northrop Grumman developed and has successfully demonstrated the software-defined radios that provide core communication, navigation and identification (CNI) functions for the F-35. This flexible, real-time reconfigurable system will eventually provide the jet with
more than 40 CNI functions, including advanced data networking capabilities. To date, it has demonstrated excellent range and stability aboard Lockheed Martin's Cooperative Avionics Test Bed (CATBird) aircraft, a flying laboratory that provides an avionics environment similar to the F-35.

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Lockheed Martin F-35 Poised to be Backbone of USAF Fighter Fleet — Press Release

Lockheed Martin F-35 Poised to be Backbone of USAF Fighter Fleet

ORLANDO, Fla., Feb. 19 /PRNewswire/ — The United States Air Force officially becomes the first F-35 Lightning II customer later this year, when the first of the stealth fighters is delivered to Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The delivery will initiate a massive recapitalization of the Air Force’s multi-role fighter fleet, and will usher in profound increases in capability, a Lockheed Martin (NYSE:LMT) executive said Friday.

“The first two production F-35s are in final assembly at Lockheed Martin’s Fort Worth plant, and the training wing at Eglin is primed to receive them and get their pilots in the seats,” said Steve O’Bryan, Lockheed Martin vice president of F-35 Business Development and Customer Engagement. “The Air Force is by far the biggest F-35 customer, and the fact that the largest and most powerful air force in the world is staking its future on the capabilities of this aircraft speaks volumes.” The Air Force plans to operate 1,763 F-35As, which along with the F-22, ultimately will replace all of the Air Force’s current fighter fleet.

“The F-35 will be flown by the U.S. Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps, as well as our closest allies. This means that the USAF and the rest of the world’s great air forces will be flying the F-35 together in the future,” O’Bryan said. “The F-35 provides ‘best value’ in a package that not only deters hostilities but enhances interoperability.”

Speaking Friday at the Air Force Association’s Air Warfare Symposium at the Rosen Shingle Creek Hotel, O’Bryan pointed to the pillars of the F-35 program – affordability, survivability, lethality and supportability – and highlighted the F-35’s value proposition. “As a 5th generation fighter, the F-35 is redefining the term ‘multirole fighter’ combining unprecedented situational awareness, net-enabled systems, sensor fusion, advanced sustainment, stealth and fighter performance in an affordable and supportable package.”

With more than 150 test flights completed, all systems operating in F-35 aircraft, other surrogate test aircraft and laboratories, and 35 aircraft in assembly, the program is demonstrating steady progress toward meeting its commitments to the U.S. Air Force. Last November, AF-1, the first optimized conventional takeoff and landing variant (CTOL) aircraft, celebrated its initial flight, piloted by Lockheed Martin test pilot David “Doc” Nelson.

Of particular interest to the Air Force, the CTOL variant establishes new levels of operational availability. With simplicity and ease of maintenance designed in, the aircraft has unprecedented reliability and maintainability requirements, along with a reduced deployment footprint. The F-35A will provide unequaled multimission capability with a fraction of the support required by legacy fighters.

The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled operations, and lower operational and support costs. Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 140,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The Corporation reported 2009 sales of $45.2 billion.

F-35 and Lightning II are trademarks of Lockheed Martin Corporation.

For additional information, visit our Web site:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/

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Pratt & Whitney Delivers Final Conventional Take Off and Landing/Carrier Variant F135 System Development and Demonstration Engine — Press Release

Pratt & Whitney Delivers Final Conventional Take Off and Landing/Carrier Variant F135 System Development and Demonstration Engine

EAST HARTFORD, Conn., Jan. 5 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — Pratt & Whitney has delivered its final Conventional Take Off and Landing/Carrier Variant (CTOL/CV) F135 flight test engine to the F-35 Joint Program Office, marking another major milestone as the program transitions from System Development and Demonstration to production. Pratt & Whitney is a United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX) company.

“I am tremendously proud of the Pratt & Whitney F135 team who has worked so tirelessly over the last eight years, in partnership with the F-35 Joint Program Office and Lockheed Martin, to get to this significant point in the F135 program,” said Warren Boley, Vice President of F135 Engine Programs. “This final CTOL/CV F135 engine delivery is another demonstration of the continued maturing of this engine program, which has logged more than 12,850 test hours and will begin production engine deliveries later this month.”

Pratt & Whitney has delivered 17 flight test engines and expects to deliver the final Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) flight test engine early this year.

“What makes this milestone even more exciting is that it signifies a transition from development activity to production, as we are poised to deliver our first production CTOL/CV F135 engine within several days of delivering this final CTOL flight test engine,” Boley said. “We are proud to continue successfully powering the F-35 Lightning II flight test program, and our eyes are also trained on the day when our first production F135 CTOL engine will be installed in a production F-35 and delivered to our military men and women.”

Pratt & Whitney has designed, developed and tested the F135 to deliver the most advanced fifth generation fighter engine for the U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy, as well as eight international partner countries. The F135 is derived from proven technology of the only operational fifth generation fighter engine, the Pratt & Whitney F119. It has been further enhanced with technologies developed in several Air Force and Navy technology programs.

The F135 is the only engine powering the F-35 Lightning II flight test program. The F135 propulsion system has proven it can meet diverse aircraft requirements, and the ground and flight test experience demonstrates the maturity and the associated reliability of the F135 engine for armed forces around the world.

Pratt & Whitney is a world leader in the design, manufacture and service of aircraft engines, space propulsion systems and industrial gas turbines. United Technologies, based in Hartford, Conn., is a diversified company providing high technology products and services to the global aerospace and building industries.

This press release contains forward-looking statements concerning future business opportunities. Actual results may differ materially from those projected as a result of certain risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to changes in funding related to the F-35 aircraft and F135 engines, changes in government procurement priorities and practices or in the number of aircraft to be built; challenges in the design, development, production and support of technologies; as well as other risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to those detailed from time to time in United Technologies Corp.’s Securities and Exchange Commission filings.

Erin Dick
Pratt & Whitney Military Engines
860.557.0122
860.565.9600
[email protected]

Source: Pratt & Whitney

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Hear from key Joint Strike Fighter Nations at Fighter Training 2009 – Press Release

ft-jpgSMi’s Fighter Training conference is well timed to provide you with the most up-to-date review of international fighter training programmes. Hear from key Joint Strike Fighter nations including, UK, USA, Italy, Norway and Canada.

Taking place in London (UK) between the 3 – 4 June, you will have the opportunity to assess front line training adapted to an operational environment. Additionally take the chance to discuss the latest training methods, technologies and requirements; including presentations on simulation training, UKMFTS, the P5 combat training system and T-38 Talon Training.

Over 17 global experts at the forefront of next generation fighter training programmes will be speaking. They include Major Andrea Truppo, 20th Squadron Euro Fighter 2000 OCU Commander, 4th Wing Grosseto, Italian Air Force: Wing Commander Bob Young, S01 Synthetic Training, Air Command, Royal Air Force, UK; Colonel David E Peterson, Commander, 80th Flying Training Wing, U.S. Air Force; Lieutenant Colonel Robert Persson, Commander, 1 Squadron, F7 Wing, Swedish Air Force; Lieutenant Colonel Musa Mbhokata, Second in Charge 2 Squadron, Air Force Base Makhado, South African Air Force; and Lieutenant Colonel Jesus Caballero Calzada, 23rd Wing, Spanish Fighter School.

The agenda will address the most-up-to-date international fighter training programmes and asks how far the training can take the aviator. Understand new training methods being used at national and multi-national level to prepare pilots for operations.

There will be a pre-conference workshop on June 2 hosted by Innov8learning which will provide delegates with an open and interactive environment to discuss the latest developments in Instructional Design, the limitations of classroom based training, e-learning, simulation and mission rehearsal.

For full details visit www.smi-online.co.uk/09fightertraining3.asp

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