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Chromalloy Crosses One-Year Milestone on Northrop Grumman KC-10 Contractor Logistic Support Team — Press Release

Chromalloy Crosses One-Year Milestone on Northrop Grumman KC-10 Contractor Logistic Support Team

U.S. Air Force Saving Millions with Non-OEM Engine Services That Deliver Improved Performance, Reduced Fuel Consumption

PR Newswire

ORANGEBURG, N.Y., Feb. 15, 2011

ORANGEBURG, N.Y., Feb. 15, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Chromalloy announced today that it has crossed the one-year milestone as a member of the Northrop Grumman team on the KC-10 Extender Logistics Support program, overhauling 48 CF6-50C2 aircraft engines in the initial program year while meeting turnaround time requirements and improving engine performance.

The contract provides support for the U.S. Air Force KC-10 refueling fleet of 59 aircraft. Under the $540 million, six year contract with up to three incentive years that commenced in 2010, Chromalloy, with team member MTU Maintenance, is overhauling and repairing a fleet of 204 engines and an additional 77 auxiliary power units that provide energy for secondary electrical systems.

“Chromalloy is servicing the CF6 engine fleet and replacing worn parts using proprietary Designated Engineering Representative repairs and Parts Manufacturer Approval components,” said Armand F. Lauzon, Jr., President. “Our FAA-certified DER repairs and PMA components have flown successfully for years in commercial airliners and now are delivering the same savings and performance improvement to the KC-10 fleet.

“When compared with the previous contract we are pleased that the U.S. Air Force is saving more than $1 million per engine shop visit,” Lauzon added.

The Air Force service contract represents a first within the Department of Defense because it is the first major program to provide blanket approval for the use of FAA-approved alternative – or non-OEM – parts and repairs.

Use of FAA-approved parts and repairs developed for the commercial CF6-50 engine that has been in service for more than 40 years allows Chromalloy and MTU to deliver cost and engine performance benefits with every overhauled engine.

Approximately $500,000 of savings per engine is attributable to the use of alternative parts and repairs.

In addition, each of the 48 engines was delivered with Exhaust Gas Temperature margins above the U.S. Air Force threshold requirement, allowing the engines to run longer on wing and increasing the mean time between removal. “The team believes this engine performance will translate to greater savings from significantly increased time on-wing,” Lauzon said.

With 52 sales, repair and manufacturing locations in 17 countries, Chromalloy is the world’s largest independent supplier of technologically advanced repairs, coatings, and FAA-approved replacement parts for turbine airfoils and other critical engine components for commercial airlines, the military and industrial turbine engine applications.

The company’s engineered components and blades are subject to the same FAA requirements and scrutiny as OEM-produced equipment.

Chromalloy’s replacement parts for aircraft engines are FAA certified to meet or exceed the performance, reliability and durability specifications of original equipment manufacturer parts. In support of marine and land-based gas turbines, the company employs identical engineering disciplines used to produce its FAA-certified parts.

The company’s continued investment in research and development of coatings and repair and manufacturing technology has led to the development of electron beam physical vapor deposition with ceramic materials, vacuum plasma, diffused precious metal / aluminide coatings, and vision-guided interactive laser welding and drilling for most advanced turbine engine components, as well as many other advanced technologies. More information is at www.chromalloy.com.

Chromalloy has evolved from a gas turbine parts repair business into the leading independent supplier of advanced repairs, FAA approved replacement parts and maintenance, repair and overhaul for gas turbines used in aviation and land-based applications. Chromalloy serves the airline, military, marine and industrial gas turbine segments with a broad range of services at locations in 17 countries around the globe. Chromalloy is authorized by the FAA and EASA and many other NAAs, and is qualified under ISO and NADCAP. Chromalloy is a subsidiary of Sequa Corporation.

Sequa Corporation is a diversified industrial company with operations in the aerospace, metal coatings and automotive industries. Sequa is a Carlyle Group company. For additional information, visit www.sequa.com.

SOURCE Chromalloy

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GE ROLLS-ROYCE FIGHTER ENGINE TEAM HITS AFTERBURNER ON THIRD NEW ENGINE — Press Release

GE ROLLS-ROYCE FIGHTER ENGINE TEAM HITS AFTERBURNER ON THIRD NEW ENGINE

Evendale, Ohio, US – 22 March 2010 – The GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team has successfully hit full afterburner on its third new production-configuration engine, continuing a year of major progress and milestones for the F136 program.

The afterburner tests were conducted in an advanced testing facility at GE. All major objectives have been reached during this phase of testing, which included an engine nozzle common to both F-35 engine programs. The Joint Strike Fighter aircraft was designed from its inception to include interchangeability with the F136 engine.

Six F136 engines are scheduled for testing this year, to measure engine performance and endurance as the competitive engine for the F-35 program continues to demonstrate steady progress and significant milestones.

F136 performance is meeting all expectations in terms of thrust, temperature margins, and fuel consumption — confirming the vital role that it will play competing in the Joint Strike Fighter program over several decades.

“We are marching along in development, making progress every day, and achieving full afterburner on our newest engine demonstrates the capability and success of the F136 team. It also means the F-35 program is another step closer to reaping the proven benefits of enduring competition in the engine program,” said Al DiLibero, President of the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team.

“This year will be the biggest yet for the F136 program as we ramp up our test program and move toward flight test. The F136 is designed specifically for the F-35 aircraft, with an engine core sized for the aircraft’s current and future needs,” said Mark Rhodes, Senior Vice President of the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team.

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Northrop Wins Contract To Re-Engine the E-8C JSTARS

The U.S. Air Force operates E-8C JSTARS aircraft to survey the ground and provide information to combat commanders on enemy forces and movements. They are converted Boeing 707 aircraft carrying radars and other sensors. The aircraft were used successfully in Desert Storm but were designed to support the defense of Western Europe against the Soviet Union. That threat has obviously passed.

The aircraft were converted by Northrop Grumman at a facility in Florida. They are aging and money is being spent to upgrade the platforms and systems since the replacement E-12 MC2A was canceled a few years ago. Northrop was awarded a contract worth over $200 million to re-engine two of the aircraft. New engines will extend their useful life, improve fuel consumption and increase the range and mission time of the E-8. It is a wise investment of money into these capable and useful platfomrs.

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Rolls-Royce To Build New Engine Controls For OH-58D

The OH-58D Kiowa Warrior is the standard reconnaissance helicopter in use by the U.S. Army. As all Army Aviation it has seen a great deal of use in Iraq. Ultimately it will be replaced by the result of the current Armed Aerial Scout program. This replaced the failed Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter (ARH) program which was canceled in 2008. Due to this failure the Army must continue to invest money into the OH-58 to keep it fighting.

Rolls-Royce was awarded a contract to develop a new Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) for the aircraft. This system is one of the key components of the upgrades to the aircraft. No value for the contract was provided. FADEC systems are becoming common on helicopters and fixed wing aircraft and aid in managing fuel consumption and performance. Rolls-Royce manufactures the M250 engines for the Kiowa Warrior at their plant in Indianapolis.

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