Payday Loans Online

CSC Wins $50 Million Department of Defense Subcontract for Analytics Modernization

FALLS CHURCH, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--CSC announced today that Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC), of Los Angeles, Calif., awarded the company a subcontract to provide analytics modernization services to the Department of Defense.

Add to digg Add to del.icio.us Add to Newsvine Add to Reddit Add to Google Add to Yahoo My Web Email this Article

Naval Air Station Key West Implements the RAPIDGate Program

KEY WEST, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Naval Air Station Key West (NAS Key West) is participating in the Navy initiative to increase security and streamline installation access by implementing the RAPIDGate® Program. The patented program, offered by Eid Passport, Inc., will manage installation access for vendors, suppliers, service providers and contractors. The program is offered as a solution to mitigate the delays expected as a result of recent changes in Department of Defense (DoD) and Commander,

Add to digg Add to del.icio.us Add to Newsvine Add to Reddit Add to Google Add to Yahoo My Web Email this Article

SRA Wins $100 Million Contract with Department of Defense

FAIRFAX, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--SRA International, Inc. (NYSE: SRX), a leading provider of technology and strategic consulting services and solutions to government organizations and commercial clients, today announced that the Department of Defense (DoD) awarded the company a re-compete contract to support the receipt and scientific review of research grant applications for DoD’s Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP). The contract has a potential total dollar value of $100 mi

Add to digg Add to del.icio.us Add to Newsvine Add to Reddit Add to Google Add to Yahoo My Web Email this Article

Naval Air Station Pensacola Streamlines Access While Strengthening Security with the RAPIDGate Program

PENSACOLA, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Naval Air Station Pensacola (NAS Pensacola) is participating in the Navy initiative to increase security and streamline installation access by implementing the RAPIDGate® Program. The patented program, offered by Eid Passport, Inc., will manage installation access for vendors, suppliers, service providers and contractors. The program is offered as a solution to mitigate the delays expected as a result of recent changes in Department of Defense (DoD) and Commande

Add to digg Add to del.icio.us Add to Newsvine Add to Reddit Add to Google Add to Yahoo My Web Email this Article

Naval Base Ventura County Streamlines Access with the RAPIDgate Program and Further Tightens Security

POINT MUGU, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) is further increasing security procedures for vendors, suppliers, service providers and contractors who access the installation. Just over a year ago, NBVC proactively pursued increased security procedures and streamlined installation access by implementing the RAPIDGate® Program from Eid Passport. The program is now part of a Navy initiative to streamline access due to recent changes in Department of Defense (DoD) and Command

Add to digg Add to del.icio.us Add to Newsvine Add to Reddit Add to Google Add to Yahoo My Web Email this Article

Social Media for Defense and Government Conference to Present Innovative Social Media Strategies Designed to Bolster Organizational Performance

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Institute for Defense and Government Advancement (IDGA) is pleased to announce its 3rd Social Media for Defense and Government Conference, scheduled for October 18 - 20, 2010 in Washington, DC. Web 2.0 and Social Media strategies have been implemented throughout most of the government and the Department of Defense. However, simply having a Facebook page, Twitter account, YouTube channel or Linked In page is not enough; organizations and commands need to be strategi

Add to digg Add to del.icio.us Add to Newsvine Add to Reddit Add to Google Add to Yahoo My Web Email this Article

Oshkosh Defense Responds to U.S. Army’s Need for Tactical Vehicles; U.S. Army Program Maintains Original FMTV Contract Timeline — Press Release

Oshkosh Defense Responds to U.S. Army’s Need for Tactical Vehicles; U.S. Army Program Maintains Original FMTV Contract Timeline

OSHKOSH, Wis. (July 8, 2010) — Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation (NYSE:OSK), announced today it has received two orders from the U.S. Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command (LCMC) to supply 950 U.S. Army Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) trucks and trailers. Oshkosh continues to hold fast to the Army’s original FMTV delivery schedule and expects to complete deliveries for these latest awards by December 2011.

“Oshkosh remains on target for FMTV production-unit deliveries starting in October of this year, allowing our men and women in uniform to receive these essential vehicles as quickly as possible,” said Mike Ivy, vice president and general manager of Army Programs for Oshkosh Defense. “From testing and production to training and service, we intend to satisfy every Army requirement related to the FMTV program with high quality Oshkosh products delivered on schedule.”

The two delivery orders, valued at more than $136 million, include nearly 800 trucks and more than 160 trailers, increasing the total number of Oshkosh FMTV truck-and-trailer under order to 6,159. Oshkosh also will supply nearly 40 FMTV add-on armor “B” kits under the orders.

The five-year FMTV contract is for the production of up to 23,000 vehicles and trailers, as well as support services and training through fiscal 2014. The FMTV is a series of 17 models ranging from 2.5-ton to 10-ton payloads. Vehicles feature a parts commonality of more than 80 percent, resulting in streamlined maintenance, training, sustainment and overall cost efficiency for the U.S. Army.

About Oshkosh Defense

Oshkosh Defense, a division of Oshkosh Corporation, is an industry-leading global designer and manufacturer of tactical military trucks and armored wheeled vehicles, delivering a full product line of conventional and hybrid vehicles, advanced armor options, proprietary suspensions and vehicles with payloads that can exceed 70 tons. Oshkosh Defense provides a global service and supply network including full life-cycle support and remanufacturing, and its vehicles are recognized the world over for superior performance, reliability and protection. For more information, visit www.oshkoshdefense.com.

About Oshkosh Corporation

Oshkosh Corporation is a leading designer, manufacturer and marketer of a broad range of specialty access equipment, commercial, fire & emergency and military vehicles and vehicle bodies. Oshkosh Corporation manufactures, distributes and services products under the brands of Oshkosh®, JLG®, Pierce®, McNeilus®, Medtec®, Jerr-Dan®, Oshkosh Specialty Vehicles, Frontline™, SMIT™, CON-E-CO®, London® and IMT®. Oshkosh products are valued worldwide in businesses where high quality, superior performance, rugged reliability and long-term value are paramount. For more information, visit www.oshkoshcorporation.com.

®, ™ All brand names referred to in this news release are trademarks of Oshkosh Corporation or its subsidiary companies.
Read more

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Today in the Department of Defense, Thursday, July 08, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Thursday, July 08, 2010
July 8, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen will conduct a press briefing today at 2 p.m. EDT in the Department of Defense (DoD) Briefing Room, Pentagon 2E973.

Technorati Tags:
,



Defense Department Food Selling Rules Snag Local Seafood Company

The United State Department of Defense buys a great deal of different things to equip and support its soldiers, sailors and airmen. This includes not only their equipment and weapons, but also their health care, housing and support. Part of that is the network of stores runs by the Armed Forces Exchange Service (AFES) and the Navy Exchange Service (NES). These operate on military installations and overseas to provide goods to military personnel, dependents and retirees. Exchanges are large department stores and Commissaries are the supermarkets.

The commissaries pride themselves on offering the same goods and brands as supermarkets on the civilian market. To aid this Congress has passed special rules and regulations relating to their purchasing items for sale on their shelves. These include a waiver of the rule to have multiple bids for a product. By limiting competition this way the national brands are available to the shopper; not just those of the lowest bidder.

Unfortunately Alder Foods, Inc. of New England has fallen a foul of those rules and may lose its privileges of selling its seafood products in commissaries.

In order to be considered “name brand” and be sold the products must also be sold on the commercial market. Alder sells its Rainbow Seafood only to the government. It does not exist on the civilian market. This saves the company money as they don’t have to market it or deal with the costs of selling in a chain supermarket such as Stop and Shop but because of its unavailability in this market it may not be on the commissary shelves itself.

Alder ran into trouble when another seafood company was denied access to the commissaries for the same reason. That company pointed out to the government that Alder was violating the rule as well. Now Alder must begin to sell on the commercial market or face the loss of their only customer.

Legislators in Massachusetts are trying to intervene to change the rules to allow Alder to stay in the business. Of course, doing so may open it up to competition from other companies that may in the end reduce its market share.

Alder is not alone as the makers of over four hundred products are facing the same situation. The government found that they had not been enforcing the rule on existing contracts, only on new ones. Now it must be enforced in all cases and that will cost some businesses money and force them into markets where they haven’t ever competed.

Federal procurement is complicated and government by myriad regulations and laws. Sometimes these work to help companies and and in this example they may work against them. Ideally the government should be buying everything competitively with the goal of getting the best product for the best price.

It doesn’t always work out that way.

Photo from ma

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Today in the Department of Defense, Wednesday, July 07, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Wednesday, July 07, 2010
July 6, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn have no public or media events on their schedules.

Lt. Gen. David M. Rodriguez, commander, International Security Assistance Force Joint Command and deputy commander, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan, will brief live from Afghanistan at 10 a.m. EDT, July 7, in the DoD Briefing Studio, Pentagon 2E973, to provide an update on ongoing operations in Afghanistan.

Today in the Department of Defense, Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Tuesday, July 06, 2010
July 2, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates hosts an honor cordon to welcome Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to the Pentagon at 2:15 p.m. EDT. The cordon will be held on the steps of the Pentagon River Entrance.

Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn has no public or media events on his schedule.

Technorati Tags:
,



Today in the Department of Defense, Friday, July 02, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Friday, July 02, 2010
July 1, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn have no public or media events on their schedules.

Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen participates in an Operation USO Care Package event at 10 a.m. EDT in conference room B, Pentagon Conference Center.

Technorati Tags:
,



Today in the Department of Defense, Monday, June 28, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Monday, June 28, 2010
June 25, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates hosts an honor cordon to welcome Bulgarian Minister of Defense Anyu Angelov to the Pentagon at 10:30 a.m. EDT. The cordon will be held on the steps of the Pentagon River Entrance.

Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn has no public or media events on his schedule.

A National Capital Region flyover of Arlington National Cemetery occurs at 3:05 p.m. EDT with two T-1's.

Technorati Tags:
,



Today in the Department of Defense, Monday, June 28, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Monday, June 28, 2010
June 25, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates hosts an honor cordon to welcome Bulgarian Minister of Defense Anyu Angelov to the Pentagon at 10:30 a.m. EDT. The cordon will be held on the steps of the Pentagon River Entrance.

Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn has no public or media events on his schedule.

A National Capital Region flyover of Arlington National Cemetery occurs at 3:05 p.m. EDT with two T-1's.

Technorati Tags:
,



More American Clothing for the U.S. Army from American Apparel

The U.S. Department of Defense desires to buy things as efficiently and effectively as possible. At the same time it operates under rules by Congress to favor certain business and types of companies. One of these rules is to buy their uniforms and clothing from American companies. This helps that industry as well as maintains quality products for the military. The negative is that the prices may not be the best that can be received without foriegn competition.

The U.S. Army placed an order with American Apparel (APP) to buy uniform coats. This contract is worth over $55 million if all options are exercised. The work will be done at various American Apparel facilities in the South and Northeast.

Certainly the U.S. taxpayer can expect that parts of the defense budget will be used to help and support home based industries and any cost differential which normally is slight is a small price to pay for that.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Senior Executive Service Appointments and Reassignments

Senior Executive Service Appointments and Reassignments
June 22, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates announced the following Department of Defense Senior Executive Service appointment;

J.D. Sicilia has been appointed to the Senior Executive Service and is assigned as director, Department of Defense Strategic Management and Performance, Office of the Deputy Chief Management Officer (ODCMO), Washington, D.C. Sicilia previously served as director, DoD Lean Six Sigma Program Office, ODCMO, Washington, D.C.

Technorati Tags:
,



Defense Secretary Gates Statement on McChrystal Profile

Defense Secretary Gates Statement on McChrystal Profile
June 22, 2010

"I read with concern the profile piece on Gen. Stanley McChrystal in the upcoming edition of 'Rolling Stone' magazine. I believe that Gen. McChrystal made a significant mistake and exercised poor judgment in this case. We are fighting a war against al Qaeda and its extremist allies, who directly threaten the United States, Afghanistan, and our friends and allies around the world. Going forward, we must pursue this mission with a unity of purpose. Our troops and coalition partners are making extraordinary sacrifices on behalf of our security, and our singular focus must be on supporting them and succeeding in Afghanistan without such distractions. Gen. McChrystal has apologized to me and is similarly reaching out to others named in this article to apologize to them as well. I have recalled Gen. McChrystal to Washington to discuss this in person."

Technorati Tags:
, ,



Today in the Department of Defense, Friday, June 18, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Friday, June 18, 2010
June 17, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn have no public or media events on their schedules.

Lt. Gen. Michael D. Barbero, U.S. Forces - Iraq deputy commanding general for advising and training and commanding general, NATO Training Mission-Iraq, will brief the media at 10 a.m. EDT in the DoD Briefing Room, Pentagon 2E973.

A National Capital Region Flyover of Arlington National Cemetery occurs at 1:05 p.m. EDT with four A-10's.

Technorati Tags:
,



House Armed Services Committee: schedule for the week of June 14 – June 18, 2010

June 10, 2010 by · Comment
Filed under: Syndicated Industry News 
House Armed Services Committee: schedule for the week of June 14 – June 18, 2010
Ike Skelton, Chairman
June 10, 2010

The House Armed Services Committee announces the following schedule for the week of June 14 – June 18, 2010:

Wednesday, June 16, 2010 – 1:00pm – 2118 Rayburn – Open

The Full Committee will meet to receive testimony on developments in Afghanistan.

Witnesses:

The Honorable Michèle Flournoy
Under Secretary of Defense for Policy
U.S. Department of Defense

General David H. Petraeus, USA
Commander, U.S. Central Command


###

Technorati Tags:
,



Thales Continues European Penetration of U.S. Defense Market

The U.S. Department of Defense awarded a contract to Thales Alenia Space to build the next generation of Irridium Low Earth Orbit (LEO) communications satellite. The contractor team is led by the French military electronics company but includes an Italian company as well as U.S. aerospace company Boeing (BA). The total value of this contract could be worth over $2.1 billion.

The Irridium concept was to establish a fleet of satellites that would use special handsets and relay communications around the globe. The commercial market for this company did not materialize and its biggest customer remains the U.S. military. The contract will develop and build the next set of satellites to replace the original set. The contract may also add several hundred million to launch the satellites and upgrade ground stations.

The original competitors for this contact included Loral Space & Communications (LORL) and Lockheed Martin (LMT). Loral dropped out early over concerns that it could not make money on the deal due to price pressures. Lockheed as the U.S. competitor would have seemed to be favored but it seems that the Thales team offered the best price.

Over the last twenty years or more as the U.S. industrial base has declined more-and-more U.S. business as gone to the big European defense contractors. This, though, is one of the first major space related contracts to do so. The U.S. Defense Department has been restructuring their military space programs due to some cost and schedule problems with the various new weather and communication satellites. This win demonstrates that the U.S. military is willing to look past their traditional suppliers especially when cost is a concern.

Photo from NASA Goddard Photo and Video flickr photstream.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Today in the Department of Defense, Tuesday, June 08, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Tuesday, June 08, 2010
June 7, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates is traveling.

Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn has no public or media events on his schedule.

Technorati Tags:
,



Today in the Department of Defense, Sunday, May 30, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Sunday, May 30, 2010
May 28, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn have no public or media events on their schedules.

Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen will make remarks at the 2010 National Memorial Day concert and reception at 8 p.m. EDT on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol.

Technorati Tags:
,



Latest KC-X Article At BNET: Government

This is the latest post I wrote for BNET: Government entitled “KC-X Aerial Tanker Contract Starting To Become A Farce”.

It starts “The Air Force’s ten-year effort to purchase a new aerial tanker continues rapidly seems to be disintegrating. The third attempt at awarding a contract for what has now become one of the most critical needs for the Department of Defense has been roiled by international trade, politics and concerns about the whole approach.”

You may read the rest here.

Media Availability with Secretary Gates en route to Kansas City, Missouri

Media Availability with Secretary Gates en route to Kansas City, Missouri
May 10, 2010

SEC. GATES: Okay. There are really three audiences for this speech: the Pentagon, the defense industry, and Congress. And I would say there are -- I sort of have two things I'm trying do.

The first is to -- we really never -- I've never really addressed the implications for the Defense budget of the national economic crisis. And what Eisenhower's comments allow me to do is to make the tie that we can't have a strong military if we have a weak economy.

And we're going to have to make some adjustments in the Department of Defense, taking into account not only the deficit and economic problems, but the fact that that means that there won't be significant growth in the Defense budget for as far into the future as anybody can see.

And I think, particularly since 2001, I would say especially in the Department of Defense, people have acquired some bad habits. They probably had them before 2001, but I think they've gotten worse.

With the amount of funding that has flowed into the Department, I think there's been -- as I say, there was never a whole lot of discipline, but what little there was I think has been further diminished in terms of careful management and in making tough decisions. And so what I'm trying to say is we can't afford to do business as we've gotten accustomed to doing it over the last nine years.

And we're going to have to look at programs, whether we need them, how applicable they are, and also at their cost. And we've started that in a big way with the '10 budget. We're going to continue it in the '11 budget, but it has to underpin, I think, the '12 budget.

And it just underscores the message that I've had for the Congress over the last couple of years that a dollar that they make us spend on stuff we don't need is a dollar we can't spend on what we do need. And in this constrained budget environment, that becomes all the more important.

One of the members of Congress, I'm told, said, well, why is $3 billion for the alternative engine such a big deal when we've got a trillion-dollar deficit? I would submit that's one of the reasons we have a trillion-dollar deficit, is that kind of thinking.

Three billion dollars is a lot of money in the Defense budget, and particularly in these times. And so we're not just going to roll over to preserve programs that we think we don't need, regardless of where the pressure is coming from.

The other aspect of this is not just programs, but management itself and the need to tighten up, reduce our overhead. And as you can see in the speech, my notion is, within the top line that we've been given, we need to make enough reductions in overhead to in fact sustain a 2.5 (percent) or 3 percent real growth in the force structure and our investment programs.

That's the only way we can sustain the current force structure and have investments for the future. So basically, we've got to take money out of tail and put it toward the tooth.

The second theme is in this speech, but not as strongly as in some of the others that I've given, including at the Navy League, which was fundamentally people are going to have to think more creatively in an era of limited resources about how they spend those resources, how they actually look at requirements and threats and gaps which have always been used to justify almost everything.

If you can point out a gap or an unfulfilled requirement, then you've got the justification for however-many-billion dollars you want. I want to go back and look harder at those requirements and at those gaps, and do they make any sense in the real world, even as we look ahead.

And so a speech like the one at the Navy League and one like this, in no small part is just to try and stimulate people's thinking to get out of a rut of the old thinking of where they've been for the last decade or the last two or three decades, move them more definitively away from Cold War thinking and thinking about the middle part of the 21st century.

I may want to change things, but I'm not crazy. I'm not going to cut a carrier, okay? But people ought to start thinking about how they're going to use carriers in a time when you have highly accurate cruise and ballistic missiles that can take out a carrier that costs between 10 (billion dollars) and $15 billion and has 6,000 lives on it. How do you do that differently than what you did 30 years ago or 20 years ago?

And that's what I'm trying to stimulate here, is thinking about how we use these things. That's one of the reasons that I killed the future combat vehicle last year, was that it was a product of eight or nine years' design and didn't learn -- didn't have in it any of the lessons from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. And that's what we have to be looking at.

So I'm interested in investing in the future, but the money for the future, as well as to sustain the forces we have, is going to have to come out of reductions in overhead. So that's basically -- those are kind of the two general themes, or purposes, that I have.

Q If I could start off here and ask you, the kinds of things you lay out in this speech -- maybe raising premiums on health care, reducing the number of admirals, eliminating unnecessary headquarters -- all those things have, many of those things have constituencies in Congress. It's going to be very hard to push them through Congress.

You'll be here to put the draft of this budget out; you'll write the first draft, but will you be here to fight Congress for this next year?

And is this just a speech, or can you get this done?

SEC. GATES: Oh, we'll get this done. First of all, I'm going to play an integral role in it myself with regular reporting from the different elements of the Pentagon, from the services and different agencies. We may look at consolidating agencies.

I'm just really prepared to go soup-to-nuts on this because, frankly, if we don't do this, I think we're in real trouble in three or four years.

Q Do you have a dollar figure you can associate with -- (inaudible)?

SEC. GATES: I'm trying to take the entire '12 budget. From the top line we've been given, to 3 percent, I think, is about $16 billion.

Q Sixteen (billion dollars)?

SEC. GATES: Sixteen (billion dollars), but that includes the overhead. So if you say overhead is 40 percent, so it would be closer to $10 billion if you exclude the overhead.

So what we've got to do is find something in that ballpark, and it need not be necessarily exactly that. Because as I say, we can -- what I'm looking for is between 2.5 (percent) to 3 percent.

But at 3 percent I think it would be roughly, for the non-overhead part of the Pentagon, somewhere between 10 (billion dollars) and $15 billion for '12.

Q (Inaudible.)

SEC. GATES: Well, I think, first of all --

Q (inaudible) -- in terms of attitudes.

SEC. GATES: The leadership of the services have really stepped up. In other words, the Army's totally redesigning the future combat system and vehicle; the way the Air Force has stepped up with drones and providing intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, thinking more about unmanned capabilities going forward. The Navy's just getting started with unmanned vehicles -- underwater vehicles as well as surface vehicles, but they're beginning to think about this.

But right now it's pretty much limited to sort of the top echelon of the services, and this needs to get further down into the services. But it's also a message, as I say, for both the defense industry and for Congress.

The services are probably ahead of the other two.

Q As you note in the speech, Secretary Rumsfeld was also a proponent of sort of trimming –overhead and becoming more efficient. Previous secretaries have, as well. Have you looked at their efforts -to try and figure out why they couldn't get it through and what's going to be different this time around?

SEC. GATES: Well, first of all, the national economic situation is very different than it has been ever in modern times. Second, if we want to sustain the current force structure, we have no alternative.

And as I say, I think part of it is it's a little bit like the counter-IED task force and the ISR task force and the MRAP task force. When I devote a lot of my time to it, these things tend to get done.

Q When you talk about trimming overhead, possibly even combining agencies, could something along the lines of another BRAC even be on the table here?

SEC. GATES: I don't know. As I say, I'm trying to be realistic about this.

(Laughter.)

I will tell you, the services would love to have another BRAC. But it may be in the too-hard column politically.

Q Would you like to have another BRAC?

SEC. GATES: I think being able to further consolidate facilities is always a good idea. But there are just huge political challenges associated with it. So I'm just not -- that's not an important element in what I'm trying to do.

Q Just going back to what Julian was asking, if you're not going to be here next year, who is going to carry the water on this --

SEC. GATES: Well, we'll see what happens.

Q Do you think --

SEC. GATES: (Inaudible).

Q (Inaudible) -- this is not just a 2012 budget problem, it's a long-term budget cut

SEC. GATES: Absolutely.

Q What do you envision past 2012? Do you foresee a freeze in defense spending?

SEC. GATES: Well, we have -- we worked with OMB last year, and over the original -- we got, in our negotiation with OMB we got more money out through 2015. So what I'm trying to do here is make changes that at least through 2015, within the top-line number we've been given, where we can sustain the current force structure and size of our forces in terms of personnel.

So I have a top-line number out through 2015. If we can make enough changes in overhead, then I think we can sustain the current force structure without hollowing it out through 2015.

But as I say in the speech, this isn't about just solving a 2012 problem. I want savings that we could roll in every year.

Q (Inaudible).

SEC. GATES: Yeah. And, you know, the corporate world does it all the time. We've just -- never have been under sufficient pressure to do it.

Q (Inaudible) -- on TRICARE -- talk about how retirees were hurting. (Inaudible) -- for the benefit of those still in uniform. Is there a legislative remedy to carve out exceptions and have a different pay scale? Is that what they're proposing?

SEC. GATES: We just -- what we need is congressional authority to raise the premium and the co-pay.

Q For retirees?

SEC. GATES: Yeah. It's basically for retirees, but the truth of the matter is that the increase we're talking about would be laughable to most people who have health insurance, who have non- governmental health insurance. They're very small. And the fact is there hasn't been an increase in TRICARE premiums since it was created 15 years ago.

And I'll give you a statistic that I had for one of the hearings. Under the federal employee health care program, the health insurance program for federal employees, the out-of-pocket expenses for a family of four, on average, are about $3,200 a year. For a family of four under TRICARE, it's $1,200.

Q So are you proposing -- you are going to propose an increase in the --

SEC. GATES: Well, it's one of the -- first of all, I've proposed it for the last three years, and the Congress -- (makes raspberry) -- wouldn't hear of it. But we're now getting into a situation where we've got a real problem.

Q What are some of the -- you talk about headquarters that are just approving what another headquarters has approved --

SEC. GATES: Can you believe it takes -- five four-star headquarters to get a decision on a guy and a dog up to me? (Laughter.)

Q Are you going to kill Forces Command -- Joint Forces Command?

SEC. GATES: I haven't even started to look at the specifics.

Q You don't know --

Q Is there a number? You talk about there being too many admirals in this sort of flatter organization. Is there a number that comes --

SEC. GATES: Well, I know now -- I know after this speech every flag officer will think I'm after him or her. That's just one example of where I think we haven't exercised discipline.

And they're not necessarily a target, but we have to be willing to look at everything.

Q (Inaudible).

SEC. GATES: We're going to start right away. This is going to be a long-term process.

Q (Inaudible).

SEC. GATES: I want to try and make enough -- we have 1.8 percent real growth in FY '11. Even in FY '11 I would like to get the non-overhead part up to 2.5 (percent) or 3 percent.

Q (Inaudible).

SEC. GATES: Well, no, because -- well, first of all because it's only 40 percent. So I'm not --

Q (Inaudible).

SEC. GATES: Yeah. The truth of the matter is I have just sort of come to this in the last couple of weeks. And so we haven't started to run numbers. I've gotten some -- it's like this figure I gave on what it would take in the non-overhead part.

We've run some rough numbers that are just estimates, at this point. And we'll just have to get down to cases.

The incentive for the services, one of the reasons these exercises have failed in the past is because there's no incentive for the services. They come up with savings, and it gets culled off and goes to somebody else.

An underlying principle of this, for me, is what the services save on overhead they can apply to their own programs. But I want to have a discipline that forces them to cut their overhead so they can apply it.

But the key is incentivizing them that -- you're going to make cuts in overhead in the Army; the Army gets the benefit of those cuts. And the same way with the other services.

So part of this that I think is different than in the past is incentivizing them in a way that it's in their own self-interest to do this, but with pressure from above that allows them to say to those that -- they're going to be affected, well, you know, I'm being told I've got to do this.

Q But at the same time you're -- (inaudible) -- requirements for programs. So are you still planning to --

SEC. GATES: I just want to make it realistic. I want them to stop buying things we don't need or that don't work and focus the money on future needs that we think will work.

It's just like airborne laser last year. I've been reading all these columns about how terrible it was to cut the airborne laser program. This was a program that was going to buy -- somewhere between ten and twenty 747s, and they were going to shoot down missiles on the launch pad or right after launch.

There's only one problem with that. You've got to have them in orbit all the time, and they've got to be within 100 miles of the launch site. Now, in Iran, that would be a problem.

So the point is I'm trying to enforce a discipline that we buy what we need, that people get things for the price that they can afford, and they get as many at the end of the program as they wanted at the beginning of the program. Which has been so -- we've had such a terrible record because of skyrocketing price increases.

(Cross talk.)

MR MORRELL: (Inaudible) -- let's do these three things. You can do these three down here, okay? David, Tom and then --

Q Have you thought about changing the term "requirement"? If it's not a requirement, it's a desire.

SEC. GATES: Or wish list.

Well, the problem is, "requirement" has a particular military definition in terms of something that is required to accomplish a certain mission. And it's a little bit like one of the things I go back and forth with on the services is their assessment of risk.

The risk isn't in terms of whether you can accomplish the mission; the risk is in terms of whether you can accomplish the mission in the timeline that the plan calls for. So the risk is to the plan, not getting the job done.

And so -- but when somebody says there is significant risk, or high risk, if we don't buy all of these or all of those, what that means is there is risk in achieving the planned mission within the time frame and at a cost that's been laid out in the --

Q (Inaudible) -- have to be very selective. The U.S. has to be very selective about where it uses force. In this kind of economic environment, does it follow that the United States, as a general proposition, is going to have to be very restrained?

(Cross talk.)

SEC. GATES: I think -- I do think that as we look to the future, and particularly as long -- for the next couple of years or so while we're in Iraq and Afghanistan, I think that Congress and the president would look long and hard at another military operation that would cost us $100 billion a year.

Now, if it were a genuine threat to our national security, there's no doubt in my mind they'd spend the money. But if it's one of these things where, well, maybe we should, maybe we shouldn't, I think that the cost enters in as part of the maybe-we-shouldn't.

But don't get me wrong; like I say, if there's a real threat out there, the president and the Congress will spend whatever it takes to protect the nation. But in situations where there are real choices, I think this would be a factor --

Q (Inaudible).

SEC. GATES: I don't know. It depends on -- I think it depends on developments over the next year or two.

Q I don't mean to change the subject, but I was hoping to change the subject. (Chuckles.)

On Pakistan and the Times Square incident, do you see that as resulting in the U.S. accelerating or expanding some of its military assistance programs with Pakistan, such as more special ops, that sort of thing? Does this provide an impetus to doing more with the Paks?

SEC. GATES: Well, we have always -- we've taken the position that we're willing to do as much with the Pakistanis and for the Pakistanis as they are willing to accept. It's their country; they remain in the driver's seat. They've got their foot on the accelerator.

And I think, again -- you've heard me say this before -- but I think perspective is in order here. The Pakistanis have been doing so much more than, 18 months or two years ago, any of us would have expected.

That you also have to realize that with their military operations in the west, they've started to be pretty thinly stretched themselves, as well as taking a substantial number of casualties.

So I think the cooperation has continued to improve, the relationship is continuing to improve, and I think we just keep moving in that direction.

MR MORRELL: Okay. Thank you all.

Q Thank you.

Technorati Tags:
, ,



Today in the Department of Defense, Monday, May 10, 2010

Today in the Department of Defense, Monday, May 10, 2010
May 7, 2010

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn have no public or media events on their schedules.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey will provide opening remarks on Monday, May 10 at 5:30 p.m. for the inaugural U.S. Army Africa Command Land Forces Conference at the Westfield Marriott Hotel in Chantilly, Va.

Technorati Tags:
,



« Previous PageNext Page »

>