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Bath Iron Works Awarded $39 Million for DDG 1000 Class Services — Press Release

BATH, Maine, Sept. 20, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — The U.S. Navy has awarded General Dynamics Bath Iron Works, a business unit of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), a $38.9 million modification to a previously awarded contract to perform class and engineering services associated with the detail design and construction of DDG 1000 Zumwalt-class ships.

Bath Iron Works will continue to provide manufacturing support services such as engineering, design, production control, accuracy control and information technology. Other class-support efforts include program management, contract and financial management, procurement and configuration/data management. The original contract was awarded in September 2011. Work is expected to be completed by October 2013.

Jeff Geiger, president of Bath Iron Works, said, “With all three Zumwalt-class ships now under construction, this award demonstrates the Navy’s continued confidence in Bath Iron Works. The contract enables us to continue supporting the construction of DDG 1000-class ships and allows us to maintain the critical shipyard skills needed to efficiently produce them. Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is over 60 percent complete and we are leveraging what we’ve learned in building the lead ship to support our DDG 1001 and 1002 construction efforts. We remain focused on delivering high-quality, affordable Bath-built ships to the U.S. Navy.”

The DDG 1000 Zumwalt-class destroyer is the U.S. Navy’s next-generation, guided-missile naval destroyer, leading the way for a new generation of advanced multi-mission surface combat ships. The ships will feature a low radar profile, an integrated power system and a total ship computing environment infrastructure. Armed with an array of weapons, the Zumwalt-class destroyers will provide offensive, distributed and precision fires in support of forces ashore.

More information about General Dynamics Bath Iron Works can be found at www.gdbiw.com.

More information about General Dynamics is available at www.gd.com.

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Navy Orders USS Tripoli from Huntington Ingalls Industries

The U.S. Navy continued its investment into new amphibious warfare ships by awarding a contract to Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) for LHD-7. The USS Tripoli will follow its sister ship, USS America, onto the ways in the near future. The value of the contract is for over $2 billion.

Currently the Navy is building two major amphibious ship classes. The LSD-17 class San Antonio ships and the bigger, more capable LHA class. The America and Tripoli are numbered sequentially with the Tarawa class built in the Seventies. Due to the need to support the bigger tilt rotor V-22 aircraft the America and Tripoli are designed for maximum aircraft capability and do not have a well deck for landing craft. That has been corrected in future ships of the class.

The LHA provide the ability to support large number of helicopters and V/TOL aircraft as well as carry Marines and their support equipment. The ones with a well deck allows landing craft to be loaded and deployed. They also offer hospital and C2 capabilities for operations.

The LHA and LHD ships followed the LPH class of helicopter carriers that went into service in the Sixties and saw extensive use in Vietnam. The new Tripoli name comes from one of those class ships although the Navy has operated several other ships in honor of the Marine service in North Africa against the Barbary Pirates.

HII is the ship building division of Northrop Grumman (NOC) that was spun off into a separate company. It builds amphibious warfare ships, destroyers as well as nuclear submarines at yards in Mississippi and Virginia.

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Raytheon Supports U.S. Navy Ship Production with SSDS

The U.S. Navy is still building new ships and retrofitting older ones. The future may not be so bright as budget pressures and cuts reduce the number of ships built and in service but currently contracts signed several years ago are being executed. The Navy has under construction aircraft carriers, DDG-1000 and DDG-51 destroyers, the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) and the San Antonio class amphibious warfare ships as well as numerous support ships and smaller vessels.

These all need weapons, sensors and command and control systems. Raytheon (RTN) manufactures radars, missiles and the Ship Self-Defense System (SSDS) combat management system.

Photo from AdsitAdventures’ Flickr Photostream.

The SSDS MK 2 is currently in production and is being installed on aircraft carriers and the San Antonio class. Raytheon delivered the last one from the FY2010 contract for support of LPD-26, the USS John P. Murtha, this week. 5 systems were part of that contract and 30 in total have been delivered to the U.S. Navy.

Not only does Raytheon build the hardware for the system but they continue to provide engineering services and develop the SSDS to integrate new sensors and weapons as well as upgrade previous installations.

The U.S. Navy intends to build several more carriers and LPD class ships which will require SSDS or the next evolution of the system. There will also be demands to retrofit the system to older ships which will aid Raytheon if and when the naval construction budget is cut.

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Australia Signs Contract with BAE for Warship Modernization

November 29, 2011 by · Comment
Filed under: Business Line 

Post World War II most navies end up keeping their ships for decades. This means that every several years they need to be modernized and upgraded with new equipment and systems as technology develops. This is often the most efficient way of introducing new capabilities rather then going through the process of designing and fabricating a whole new vessel. Often hull and engines had many more years of useful life allowing these systematic upgrades to occur over several decades.

Australia has over the last several years invested and plans to invest in much new and improved equipment for its armed forces. Part of this is to help spur their economy while another is to improve their overall capability. This includes plans for new armored vehicles, ships and aircraft. At the same time they continue to keep their existing assets and add to their capabilities when appropriate.

As part of this the Australian government has just issued a contract to BAE Systems (BAE:LSE) Australian subsidiary to upgrade the 7 ANZAC or Perth class frigates operated by their Navy. New Zealand also operates two of the same class ships. The contract is worth about $262 million.

The Perth are based on a the European design MEKO 200 frigate class used by Turkey, Portugal and Greece and originally manufactured by German builder Blohm + Voss. The Australian ships were delivered in the 90’s and were built in Australia.

The new contract calls for installation of new radars and combat information system. It will cause the removal of the existing masts and their replacements with new ones. The ship will continue to be armed with its existing guns and missiles which are based on American weapons. The work will be done in Australia and is expected to take about 6 years.

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Northrop Grumman’s Shipbuilding Spinoff Proceeds Smoothly

The first major shake up in the U.S. defense industry since the implementation of the reforms by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates completed last Thursday as Northrop Grumman (NOC) spun off its shipbuilding arm to its shareholders. One of the biggest defense contractors in the world the company had announced last year that they were looking at leaving the business of building warships primarily for the U.S. Navy due to contraction in that service’s plans and expected budget reductions in the future.

As soon as the transfer of the assets to the new company, Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), was complete the U.S. Navy followed up with the announcement of an order for the tenth San Antonio class amphibious assault ship, the U.S.S. John P. Murtha. The $1.5 billion ship is named for the former Congressman from Pennsylvania and Marine Corps veteran. Huntington has also inherited four other LPD-17 class ships already under construction at their Pascagoula, MS and Avondale, LA yards.

Prior to the decision to spinoff the business Nortrop had announced plans that they would consolidate their capabilities which would lead to the closing of the Avondale facility. This is still on track to be done by 2013 but the new company says there are opportunities to keep it open if viable work can be found for the shipyard. As well as the two Gulf Coast yards Huntington Ingalls now also operates Newport News shipbuilding which constructs aircraft carriers.

The decision by Northrop has led to rumors that the remaining company now separated from its services arm, TASC, and no longer building ships might be planning on merging with one of the other large defense contractors such as Boeing (BA), Lockheed Martin (LMT), General Dynamics (GD) or Raytheon (RTN). Moves like that were not uncommon in the Nineties when last the defense budget declined precipitously. This time around, though, the Pentagon has made it clear that it does not want to reduce industrial base capabilities and may not allow such mergers.

Huntington Ingalls must compete with primarily General Dynamics for a small shipbuilding budget for cruisers, destroyers and larger amphibious ships. The Navy is building at least twenty Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) over the next several years but these are smaller combatants made in smaller yards owned by Austal America and Marinette Marine. The U.S. if it wants to preserve industrial base must award enough ships to keep both companies going and their yards open.

Photo from surfaceforces’ flickr photostream.

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General Dynamics NASSCO Delivers USNS Charles Drew

General Dynamics NASSCO Delivers USNS Charles Drew
July 14, 2010

SAN DIEGO, -General Dynamics NASSCO, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), today delivered USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) to the U.S. Navy. The ship is named in honor of Dr. Charles R. Drew (1904-1950), the African American surgeon and hematologist who pioneered the procedures for the safe storage and transfusion of blood.

NASSCO began construction of USNS Charles Drew in October 2008. The 689- foot-long supply ship will serve under the Navy's Military Sealift Command. The ship is capable of delivering almost 10,000 tons of dry cargo and petroleum products at one time to Navy and allied ships underway at sea.

Including the Charles Drew, NASSCO has delivered ten T-AKEs, which are also known as Lewis and Clark-class ships. The eleventh through thirteenth ships are under construction at the San Diego shipyard. Construction of the fourteenth and final ship of the Lewis and Clark class will begin in the fall.

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General Dynamics Awarded $172 Million by U.S. Navy for Virginia-Class Submarine Work

General Dynamics Awarded $172 Million by U.S. Navy for Virginia-Class Submarine Work
July 6, 2010

GROTON, Conn., -General Dynamics Electric Boat has been awarded a $171.8 million contract by the U.S. Navy to provide lead-yard services for Virginia-class nuclear-powered attack submarines. Electric Boat is a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD).

Under the contract, Electric Boat will maintain and update design drawings and data, including technology insertions, for each Virginia-class submarine throughout its construction and post-shakedown availability periods.

Additionally, Electric Boat will perform research and development work required to evaluate new technology to be inserted in newly built Virginia-class ships.

The contract has a potential cumulative value of $881 million through 2014 if all options are exercised and funded.

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Bollinger Shipyard Lays Keel Of First New USCG Cutter

Under a contract with the U.S. Coast Guard, Bollinger Shipyards of Louisiana laid down the keel of the first of a new class of cutters. The service may buy up to thirty-four of the new Sentinel class ships. Bollinger has won a contract to build at least four.

If all aspects of the contract are exercised the U.S.C.G. may buy another thirty of the versatile ships from multiple shipyards. Bollinger hopes to win a decent amount of the contract. It is expected that the total construction cost of the thirty-four ships will be over $1.5 billion.

The Sentinel is part of the modernization of the Coast Guard. This service has taken on many new responsibilities as part of the Homeland Security Department. The U.S.C.G. used to be part of the Department of Transportation during peace time and then would be transferred to the Department of Navy.

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General Dynamics NASSCO Delivers USNS Matthew Perry

February 24, 2010 by · Comment
Filed under: General Dynamics, Syndicated Industry News 
General Dynamics NASSCO Delivers USNS Matthew Perry
February 24, 2010 3:31:44 PM

SAN DIEGO, -- General Dynamics NASSCO, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), today delivered USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9) to the U.S. Navy. The ship is named in honor of Commodore Matthew C. Perry (1794-1858), the U.S. Navy officer who established American trade with Japan in the mid-19th century.

NASSCO began construction of USNS Matthew Perry in April 2008. The 689-
foot-long supply ship will serve under the Navy's Military Sealift Command. The ship is capable of delivering almost 10,000 tons of dry cargo and petroleum products at one time to U.S. Navy and allied ships underway at sea.

Including the Matthew Perry, NASSCO has delivered nine T-AKEs, which are
also known as Lewis and Clark-class ships. Later this week, NASSCO will
host a christening and launch ceremony for the tenth ship of the class,
USNSCharles Drew. In addition, the San Diego shipyard is now building the eleventh and twelfth Lewis and Clark-class ships, and soon expects to receive a Navy contract for the final two ships of the class, T-AKE 13 and 14.

General Dynamics NASSCO employs more than 4,300 people and is the only major ship construction yard on the West Coast of the United States. In addition to T-AKE construction, the San Diego shipyard is also building two commercial product carriers for American Petroleum Tankers, a shipbuilding joint venture led by the Blackstone Financial Group.

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Britain Begins Construction Of New Aircraft Carriers

Despite the budget problems facing Great Britain due to the costs of operations in Afghanistan and the current recession the Labor Government of Gordon Brown continues to move out on some major programs. A few days ago it was to begin construction of the new centralized contractor provided training facility in Wales. Yesterday the first sub-contracts to begin construction of the two new aircraft carriers for the Royal Navy were announced.

These total over $600 million and went to a five different companies across the country. The building of the two ships will be the biggest defense program in England for several years and are critical to the economy of Scotland. Some of the contracts are just not for parts of the ships but also for the infrastructure to support construction including transport of the sections by river to the main assembly point in Rosyth. The two Queen Elizabeth class ships will form the core of the Royal Navy for a good deal of the Twenty-First Century and will operate the F-35 Joint Strike Fighters being developed by Lockheed Martin.

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DDG-51 Construction To Continue By Northrop Grumman

Due to the restructuring of the plans for the new U.S. Navy destroyer program the U.S. Department of Defense decided to continue building the DDG-51 Arliegh Burke Class ships. Originally this ship was to end its production as more DDG-1000 were ordered and delivered. The Obama Administration and Secretary of Defense Gates decided to cut back on the plans as the program was running late and over budget. To make up for these changes it was decided to keep building DDG-51 class ships.

These ships are made by either Northrop Grumman or General Dynamics at their respective yards. Northrop Grumman received recently a contract to provide long lead materials for the next ship they will build, DDG-113. The contract has a value of over $100 million. The Arliegh Burke’s have been in service now for almost two decades and the DDG-1000 would have been larger, more stealthy and with newer systems. The DDG-51 are certainly capable and have been upgraded as time has passed.

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Northrop To Start Building Arliegh Burke Destroyers Again

The Obama Administration restructured the new U.S. Navy destroyer program as part of their 2010 budget review. The DDG-1000 program will now end after only three ships and rather then having two sources only General Dynamics (GD) will build them. A new destroyer program will be developed. Since Northrop Grumman (NOC) lost the contract they had participating in DDG-1000 the Navy gave them another one to start making more DDG-51 class ships to fill the gap created by reducing the numbers of the DDG-1000. The first of these new ships, DDG-113, began construction with Northrop receiving a contract to begin purchasing long lead items.

The DDG-51 is an evolution of the AEGIS CG-47 class cruisers started in the Seventies. It is a general purpose ship and replaces many older destroyers and frigates and has been built in large numbers. The DDG-51 certainly can be modified to conduct missile defense missions as it has the same radar and missile suite as the CG-47 class ships. The DDG-1000 incorporated many of the same weapon systems but was of stealth design and had modern propulsion and data systems.

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BAE Systems Working On Future Royal Navy Ships

The Royal Navy has one major program underway right now. This is the new aircraft carrier which hopefully will deliver the two largest carriers used by the service in its history. Now BAE Systems has announced that they are designing the new surface combatants that will support these ships as well as perform general duties. The company has just started on a preliminary design for the two destroyers. If all goes well a production contract will be awarded in about ten years. The RN hopefully will buy up to twenty of these ships.

The U.S. Navy’s DDG-1000 and Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) programs are their new warships but those programs have suffered from development and cost issues. Right now the DDG-1000 is on hold while the U.S. continues to build DDG-51 class ships. The LCS program was to have two different designs built by Northrop and General Dynamics but now a down select is planned for one ship only.

The British Government faces major budgetary pressures due to the world’s economic doldrums and social spending. This along with the cost of operations in Afghanistan may lead to limits on how many ships may be built in the future. The carrier program itself may be delayed if funding issues persist. Despite the need for new surface ships it is not necessarily the best time for programs like this.

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U.S. Navy Contracts Announced on August 18th, 2008

August 18, 2008 by · Comment
Filed under: Contract Additions, Contract Awards, U.S. Navy 

U.S. Navy Logo

Goodrich Corporation, Engineered Polymer Products Division, Jacksonville, Fla., is being awarded a ceiling amount $32,880,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract for Sonar Composite Domes and Sonar Dome Rubber Windows. Sonar Composite Domes (SCD) and Sonar Dome Rubber Windows (SDRW) requirements will provide the U.S. Navy with replacement spares. SCDs are keel-mounted equipment on FG-7 class ships; SDRWs are bow-mounted on DD963, CG47 and DDG51 class ships. The SCDs and SDRWs provide an acoustically transparent housing for the Sonar Transducer Array. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Fla., and is expected to be completed by August 2013. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-08-D-GP21).

DRS Technical Services, Inc., Herndon, Va., is being awarded a $15,733,333 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract for satellite communications equipment and training. This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of the contract to an estimated $47,200,000. Work will be performed in Herndon, Va., and is expected to be completed by Aug. 2011. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities web site and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command E-commerce website, with seven offers received. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, Charleston, S.C., is the contracting activity (N65236-08-D-5152).

ERAPSCO, Columbia City, Ind., is being awarded an $11,496,960 firm-fixed-price contract for AN/SSQ-101 sonobuoys and associated data. The AN/SSQ-101 sonobuoys are dropped from various airborne platforms and utilized for search and detection of submerged submarines. This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $17,245,440. Work will be performed in DeLeon Springs, Fla., (66 percent) and Columbia City, Ind., (34 percent), and is expected to be completed by Aug. 2010. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Ind., is the contracting activity (N00164-08-C-GP03).

Conquistador Dorado JV,* Sanford, Fla., is being awarded an $11,195,000 firm-fixed-price contract for the Airfield Vegetation Conversion Project at Naval Air Station Key West, Fla. This project is for the design and construction of drainage and conveyance systems within the airfield area, removal of vegetation, clearing and grubbing of existing vegetation. This contract contains an option, which when exercised within 365 days, will bring the contract value to $21,769,000. Work will be performed in Key West, Fla., and is expected to be completed Aug. 2010. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with four offers received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Fla., is the contracting activity (N69450-08-C-1267).

* Small Business – Disabled Veteran Owned

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