payday sitemap
payday sitemap online
payday sitemap free

Navy Continues Investment into Biofuels

The U.S. military has paid for a lot of research and small scale production of biofuels. They have already flown aircraft and sailed ships powered by them. This research while it has received some criticism in Congress has also received funding and support and will continue in the near term. It only makes sense for the U.S. military to develop alternate sources of fuel and biofuel has proved capable although at a price.

In this vein the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division in China Lake, CA awarded Albemarle Corp. (ALB) a contract to manufacture biojet fuel utilizing a feedstock from another company Cobalt Technologies. No terms of the contract were announced but the goal is to produce reasonable quantities of fuel and get it certified for use in aircraft. This is a continuation of a joint effort by Cobalt and the Navy to develop a feedstock of n-butanol from woody biomass.

Albemarle will produce the fuel at their Louisiana based processing facility.

The butanol being made by Cobalt also has many other industrial uses including making paints, coatings and plastics. The ability of Albemarle to produce large quantities of butanol based on biomass rather then traditional sources such as fossil fuels.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

U.S. Navy Continues Biofuels Investment

The U.S. military has been working for several years on testing biofuels for its use. This includes demonstrating aircraft and ships can efficiently use different types of the fuel as well as using its R&D money to help companies develop capabilities to produce the product. Long term this makes sense as at some point petroleum based fuel may be in shorter supply or at much higher cost.

The U.S. Navy has already flown an F/A-18 using such fuel. It has also invested its own money into algae and grass based production. Now they placed a major order for biofuel to power both its jet aircraft and ships.

The contracts with Solazyme and Dynamic Fuels, LLC will be for 100,000 gallons of jet fuel and 350,000 gallons of marine fuel. This is the largest order to date by the government for this type of product.

Dynamic Fuels will make the marine fuel from non-food waste blend similar to using cooking oil to power your car. Solazyme will provide algae based jet fuel.

While right now the costs for this fuel is more expensive then the normal Diesel Fuel Marine of JP used it is a long term investment and is certainly proper for the U.S. military to be doing this. Anything that will supplant a potentially dwindling supply of petroleum is a good thing.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

RAND Pours Water on Military Biofuel

Like other parts of the U.S. government and entities across the globe the Defense Department has sponsored development and research into the development of biofuels to replace oil based fuel. These have included tests by the Air Force and Navy flying aircraft using fuel made from biomass.

The services have also invested into research for different ways of making fuel. This includes algae based fuel as well as looking at plants as a source. The work has been very preliminary and involves very little money so far.

If you assume that the world’s supply of oil is going to decline sometime in the near future this investment makes sense. There has to be alternate sources developed and the U.S. military as one of the largest users of oil in the world should be preparing for that situation. The military has also argued that alternative fuel makes sense as it might reduce the need to transport fuel across rough or inhospitable terrain.

Now the RAND Copropration has released a report on their study of the future of biofuel and its use by the military. They were not positive. They feel that the supply chain may not be decreased as the fuel no matter the composition must be moved to where the troops are. They also state that large scale production of the fuel is not economical or practical in the near future.

Supporters are countering the report by saying that more research is needed and that it may not be viable to replace all gasoline usage with biofuel but reductions in use will help in the long run. They also say that not enough research has been done yet to figure out production sources and amount that ultimately could be made.

Certainly there are issues with the amount of available agricultural production that could be used to make fuel. The use of corn based ethanol in the U.S. is already putting pressure on food prices and farmers.

Unfortunately if the U.S. wants to reduce its dependence on foriegn oil without trying to increase production in the U.S. it will be this kind of research and development that will help in the long run. Any alternative fuel use can benefit the military by reducing demand or preserving stocks for critical needs.

The full report may be read here.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Solazyme Signs U.S. Department of Defense Contract to Develop Navy Fuels from Algae

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Solazyme, Inc., the renewable oil production company and leader in algal synthetic biology, has been selected by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to research, develop, and demonstrate commercial scale production of algae-derived advanced biofuel that meets the United States Navy’s rigorous specifications for military tactical platforms. Solazyme will utilize its innovative large-scale algal oil production process to provide renewable F-76 N

Add to digg Add to del.icio.us Add to Newsvine Add to Reddit Add to Google Add to Yahoo My Web Email this Article

>